View Full Version : 1945-50 cost of living - any help please?


*_ash_*
23-07-2006, 18:51
Hi, I've just read Fred Pass's Weerz me dad again,(great read) and its got me thinking about the cost of living around the late forties.

Just out of interest, i wonder if anyone in here, (or an older family member) might know some costs for me to compare with todays prices and costs, so i can understand more, how hard up working class people really were..

I've got a few from my Dad, but he's unsure of them how accurate they are..

all prices are in old money,
Bus fare (kids) 1/2d
Chips 1d
Fish 3d
Ford Popular £80 (3 year waiting list)
Fairly good semi house £750

(as you can see, not got many)

Some others i want to know, 20 ciggys, cinema ticket, pint of beer, gallon of fuel, coal, bread etc etc, anything else would be a bonus

I particularly want to know how much people earned, (otherwise, all the costs are pointless)

And finally, how much would rent be on a 'slum' property?

Hope i get some response, (i'd never seen this section of SF before)

Edit: following many posts, this is what I have so far...

I thought I'd complete this thread as I have a few days off work.

This is to compare what you could buy with your weekly wage in 1950 and 2007.

*All the sources are at the bottom.


In 1950 it would take 164 weeks to buy a house (just over 3 years).....In 2007 it will take 495 weeks (over 9 and a half years)
In 1950 it would take 96 weeks to buy a car.....In 2007 it will take 37 weeks
In 1950 you could buy 43 packs of ciggys.....In 2007 you can buy 48 packs
In 1950 you could buy 40 gallons of petrol.....In 2007 you can buy 61 gallons of unleaded
In 1950 you could buy 31 cinema tickets.....In 2007 you can visit 49 times
In 1950 you could buy 122 Mars Bars.....In 2007 you can buy 747 bars
In 1950 you could use the tram 305 times.....In 2007 you can use the Supertram 153 times
In 1950 you could buy 76 pints of beer.....In 2007 you can buy 107 pints


:)

Anyone who has taken part in the thread, or any new ones can let me know and I can add some more/ or correct any mistakes.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
*SOURCESThe average wage was calculated by comparing Policeman/Factory Worker/Tram Driver in 1950 and Policeman/Call Centre Telephonist/Tram Driver in 2007.
The house price was an average of a 3 bed semi/2 bed terr in 1950, and same for 2007.
Car was Ford Anglia vs Ford Fiesta.
Online sources:
http://www.whatprice.co.uk/financial/housing-market/house-prices.html
http://www.moneysorter.co.uk/calculator_inflation.html
http://www.tesco.com/todayattesco/pricecheck.shtml
http://www.brandnewford.co.uk/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/in_depth/uk_house_prices/html/cg.stm
http://www.supertram.net/ticketinformation.html
And of course the posts in here!
EDIT:typos

peterw
23-07-2006, 22:05
From an old un, your dad’s right about the tram fare but a good semi-detached could be had for £350. When I visit Sheffield I always make a point of going past the semi we could have had for £350 and believe me, it’s worth a hell of a lot more today.
Average wage is hard to say. My father earned around £20 a week as a steel melter but that was way above average. I was earning anything between £5 a week and £7 a week but again, it was above average for my age. I think the norm was around a fiver in the steel industry, and seem to recall — could be wrong — that policemen and tram drivers were on £3.10s.
Joke here: Don’t know the rent of a slum dwelling because we were never lucky enough to get one!
My mother during that period earned £1.10s s a housekeeper-cum-caretaker, but again this was above average because she got a house, electricity, coal, rates and other incidentals thrown in.
Cigarettes at that time had been hit by a hike in tax and Woodbines, Park Drive, Players Weights etc were either a shilling for 20 or 1s.3d., can’t really remember exactly.
Cinema — Greystones to be exact — 2d front stalls, 3d back stalls and 9d circle. City Centre, average 1s.9d. downstairs and 2s.6d upstairs. Empire theatre, 6d in the ‘Gods’, half-a-crown in the fauteils (front stalls which to my embarrassment my dad always pronounced “fart oyls”).
Bus ride from Bridge Street to Shiregreen, 3d. Tram ride from Hickmott Road to Greystones Cinema, adult 1d. Lift from The Wicker up to the railway station was ther shortest penny ride in Sheffield.
Tizer, 3d. but a penny back on the bottle. More if or when I think of them.

peterw
23-07-2006, 22:09
Petrol was around one shilling a gallon and all petrol stations gave motorists FREE air. A Ford Popular was anything between £80 and £90 but I don’t recall a waiting list, other than for a Rolls Royce!

*_ash_*
24-07-2006, 00:24
thanks for those figures peter, i suppose if policemen/tram drivers were on £3 a week, the poorest paid at the bottom of the ladder of steel workers would have been paid less? i would guess

can you remember how much a pint?

one figure that stands out peter, is the house prices, me dad said houses prices are the only thing now that are completely out of line with wages..

by these figures..
then.....£5 a week , £350 house... 70 weeks
now......£300 a week , £110,000 ...360 weeks!
even his figure of £750 would be over 150 weeks.

ash

Floridablade
24-07-2006, 01:58
I left school in 1943 and was paid 1 pound (20 shillings) for 48 hours,in 1950 for 48 hours I got around 6 and a half quid. I can remember a Ford Anglia in a dealers window on London Road priced at 470 pounds,I may be wrong on that. A terraced house on Fentonville St. Sharrow was going for 400 pounds. My father sold our house on Millmount Road in 1941 for 800 pounds,it was detached with four bay windows and walled garden.

I bought my first car,a 1947 Standard 8 in 1956 for 65 quid.

Tram fare was 1-3 old pence in the late 40s.

Pictures on Saturday morning was 2d in the stalls and 1d in the balcony.

nanrobbo
24-07-2006, 03:24
Here are a few prices I can remember
A loaf of bread 4.1/2d, rent- council house 7s 6d cheese 1s a pound? rabbits 2 for 1/6d. beer a jug 6d (I think)
Junior office wage @ 15yrs 27s 6d. tram fare 1/2d.
All I can remember- but I'll think on.

Falls
24-07-2006, 16:00
Hi,

My Uncle Ed.ordered a Ford a Popular from a well known Sheffield dealer in September 1946 and took delivery in May 1951. By the time it was delivered, it was called an Anglia. Can't remember the price of the Anglia but a Ford Prefect was closer to 200 pounds by the late 40s- early 50s.

Remember, once you had your new car at that time, there were restrictions on the sale: You couldn't sell it for, I think, two years. This was intened to stop profiterings. I remember a friend of my Father's died a few months after taking delivery of his new car. His widow couldn't drive so she had to get permission from a Ministry (Fuel and Power I think) to sell it. I car that new would sell for far more on the second hand market than it cost to buy.

Regarding tram fares, these were farely stable in the years after the war. By 1950 -51 I could ride from the Wicker to work at Darnall for 3d. Sometimes I would take the train home from Darnall station to Victoria, but this was 4d.

Of course, they did not pay apprentices much in those day. After deductions, my first take home pay was one pound, six shillings and six pence a week. I kept that first pay stub for years just for a laugh ( Do you remember the stubs used to be in a long strip that were folded before being inserted in the pay pack). When I reached 4 pounds a week, I thought I was really rolling in it.

Can't remember much about food prices but remember rationing went on, and on and on after the war. Remember sweets didn't finally come of ration until 1952. They had taken them off first in the late 40s but demand was so great that they had to re-impose rationing

Falls

seriessix
24-07-2006, 16:11
I left school in 1943 and was paid 1 pound (20 shillings) for 48 hours,in 1950 for 48 hours I got around 6 and a half quid. I can remember a Ford Anglia in a dealers window on London Road priced at 470 pounds,I may be wrong on that. A terraced house on Fentonville St. Sharrow was going for 400 pounds. My father sold our house on Millmount Road in 1941 for 800 pounds,it was detached with four bay windows and walled garden.

I bought my first car,a 1947 Standard 8 in 1956 for 65 quid.

Tram fare was 1-3 old pence in the late 40s.

Pictures on Saturday morning was 2d in the stalls and 1d in the balcony.


So that Ford Anglia was as much as a house!

Texas
24-07-2006, 18:07
When I left school in '48 my first job was around a £1 a week as a shop lad.
Shortly after I moved on up the road to a small builder as, what was laughingly called, an apprentice. (Handrag was a more apt term). The wage was £2-5s a week, raised to £2-10s after a year. I left there and started on the Railway as a cleaner at about £4-£5 a week. This was up to 1951.
Coming out of the Army in '53 I seem to remember beer was about 10d a pint.
About '55 it was a shilling a pint in the Lion, back of the City Hall.
Never could afford no car.

*_ash_*
25-07-2006, 02:45
Fantastic figures, thanks chaps/esses, its given me a much better picture, i've already worked out that ciggys and beer were much cheaper then than now, wage wise, and also it seems the trend for 20 cigs and a gallon of fuel have pretty much much stayed constant from then till now. (around a shilling then, to around a fiver now).

One thing FALLS mentioned, is something me dad remembered today, that sweets/spice, came off rationing in about 1950 (i think he said, he told me the exact date but ive forgotten already (only 5 hours ago he told me)) , and he said the next day, there wasnt a sweet available anywhere, all shops were empty! so rationing started almost the next day!!

im well pleased with so many responses so soon, looking forward to more.

ash

Falls
25-07-2006, 23:21
im well pleased with so many responses so soon, looking forward to more.
ash

Hi,

Re: House prices in your time span (1945-1950).

I recall that a semi on Retford Road at Handsworth was sold for 1400 pounds early in 1949. This was a house on the left hand side on the high bank. No chance of ever having a driveway. At the time, the price was considered to be on the high side for property without vehicle access.

Even that soon after the war, most people didn't have cars but seemed to be look to the day when they might afford one. Therefore houses with a drive way and space for a garage were fetching high prices than those without garage space.

Falls

Firemansam
30-06-2007, 10:49
I can't remember if it was 6d or 1/- (5p)to stand & watch united in 1968

alankearn
30-06-2007, 12:27
You would need £30 now (2007) to match £1 in 1945.

Play around with this



http://www.moneysorter.co.uk/calculator_inflation.html

*_ash_*
30-06-2007, 12:32
You would need £30 now (2007) to match £1 in 1945.

Play around with this



http://www.moneysorter.co.uk/calculator_inflation.html

When I originally did this thread I made my own money translator. Not sure where the final results are though. Just doing a computer change and files are everywhere. I'm interested to see how close I was.:hihi:

Fareast
30-06-2007, 12:50
One other point to remember, when comparing the power of the money in your pocket, is [ or was ] the amount of tax deducted.

If we say a man earned about 5 pounds a week in 1947 and a man earns 250-300 pounds a week in 2007, we have to remember they are both the ' top line '. Can any budding economist give us a rough idea how the taxes compare, say for a married man with 2 children or a single person ?

lazyherbert
30-06-2007, 13:16
One other point to remember, when comparing the power of the money in your pocket, is [ or was ] the amount of tax deducted.

If we say a man earned about 5 pounds a week in 1947 and a man earns 250-300 pounds a week in 2007, we have to remember they are both the ' top line '. Can any budding economist give us a rough idea how the taxes compare, say for a married man with 2 children or a single person ?

For a single person in the 1960s the tax was 30% (I think).If you were married with children, the more children you had the less tax you paid.

flyer
30-06-2007, 19:13
my dad got 3pound in 44 for an trad'sman' but use to be a miner they got twice that amount with ton's of free coal you was never cold in a miner's house

BLITZER
30-06-2007, 20:35
Skilled building craftsmen were on 2/6d an hour in 1946. A bespoke new suit was about £3, a new shirt 3/6d, a haircut about a shilling or less, a 2oz bar of Cadbury's milk chocolate 2d .a box of matches (Englands Glory) 1d, an oxo cube 1d, a popular newspaper 1d, Radio times 2d, Wrigley's spearmint 1d(5pieces) Pint of milk 2d(I think) A local telephone call from a call box 2d - no time limit. If you wanted to see the Doctor,then you just turned up at his (only one Dr) surgery,and took your turn to see him.

poppins
30-06-2007, 20:56
Imagine if we knew back then what we know now ? we would all be millionaires :(

Floridablade
30-06-2007, 23:36
Oddly clothing was the last to come off rationing, about 1953 difficult to understand when lancashire and Yorkshire were the worlds cotton and wool centres. I was a tram conductor in the early 50s and a stage cost one and a half old pennies.

Floridablade
30-06-2007, 23:39
For all the comics reading the above it was a fare stage.

Wotwosit
01-07-2007, 15:23
Try Google for "Value of Money" for a load of links on how the value of the £ has changed. There is

http://www.gatesheadgrid.org/westallswar/archives/cat_1941_snapshot.htm
which gives typical proces of some goods in 1941 -as below

What things cost in 1941


* Embassy cigarettes, 10 for 9d (4p) (0.06USD)

* Wisdom toothbrushes, 2/5d (12p) (0.17USD) each

* Eve toilet soap 3d (1.5p) (0.02USD) per bar

* Palmolive toilet soap 4d (2p) (0.03USD) per bar

* Vim 6d (2.5p) (0.04USD) per canister

* De Reszke Minor cigarettes, 10 for 61/2d (2.5p) (0.04USD)

* Hartley's headlamp masks 10/6 (52.5p) to 12/6d (62.5p) each

* Gibbs Dentifrice 71/2d (3.5p) (0.05USD) per tin

* Cremola Pudding 3d (1.5p) and 6d (2.5p) per pkt

* Rowntrees cocoa 5d (2p) per 1/4lb and 91/2d (3.5p) per 1/2lb

* Cadbury's Ration Chocolate sold at 21/2d (1p) per bar, the supply was very limited - and the weight of the bar was not mentioned.

* Gamages shirt (with a spare collar) at 6/11d (35p) (0.52USD)

* a pair of flannel trousers at 15/9d (78p) (1.16USD)

* a pair of shoes, all leather at 13/9d (68p) (1.01USD)

* mans self lined raincoat for 1 guinea = £1/1/- (£1.05) (1.56USD)

or from http://www.worldwar2exraf.co.uk/Online%20Museum/Museum%20Docs/Cost%20of%20living%202.htm

HOW MUCH DID THINGS COST ?

Below are listed some of the items that people might buy during world war 2 showing the average cost of each item (prices may vary depending on where they were bought)






A typical war time 3 bedroom semi detached house in Sheffield would cost approximately £550

Average cost for a family of 4 for coal for one week 4/- (20p)

Average cost for a family of 4 for Gas and Electricity for one week 2/- (10p)

Average cost for food for a family of 4 for one week £1.4.0 (£1.20)




1940 Ford Anglia E04A



A 1940 Ford Anglia E04A de luxe would cost you £140 although the same car in 1945 cost a staggering £293.

Petrol would cost on average 1/6 a gallon (7.5p) (coupons were also needed to buy petrol)







A loaf of bread would cost about 4d a loaf (2p) although most people made their own bread, especially those on a low income with children.

A pint of milk cost 2d a pint (1p)

A 1lb Jar of Strawberry Jam cost 11d (4.5p)








Tin of Beans would cost 7d (3p)
Dozen large eggs 1/6 (7.5p)

1lb Pork Sausages 1/3 (6p)

Packet of Scott's porage oats 1lb pack 4 1/2d (2.5p) 2lb pack 9p (4p)

Small box of washing powder cost 6d (2.5p)

A Mars Bar would cost you sixpence (2.5p)

A Kit Kat cost 2d (1p)

Fry's Chocolate cream bar 1 1/2d (1p)

A small tube of toothpaste cost 6d (2.5p)

Tooth brush 1/3 (6p)

Bar of soap cost on average of 4d (2p)

Toilet rolls 2/3 (11p)

Yardley perfume from 2/6 to 42/- (12.5p - £2.10)

Yardley Talcum powder 1/2 (6p)

Lipstick 6/6 (32.5p)

Satin-serge dress 36/11 (£1.84.5p)

Mans suit from 55/- (£2.75)

Mans pullover 8/9 (44p)

Mans Shirt 8/9 (44p)

Mens shoes 17/9 (89p)

Boys short trousers flannel suit 24/6 (£1.22.5)

Daily News Paper 1d (2d on a sunday)

Applegrim
01-07-2007, 16:41
have an old calendar called "Do you remember the old Sheffield?" dated 1980,
on the first page is Lizzie Thomas Ward's elephant,but it contains some wonderful old and new pictures of how sheffield was from1900 onwards till 1980 and the prices of differant things eg.1902 council workers £1.5.0 for six days a week, twelve hour shifts with no meal breaks, women half that. 1946 bread rationed one egg per week per person,1940 onions on ration 2lbs per person per year,cheese rationed to one ounce per personh per week,1937 Bungalow is £575
or b£25 deposit and 15/- a week.1946 Top charge for restaurant meal fixed at 5/-. 1962 Whiskey 41/6. Marmalade half pound 1/2d. John West salmon 3/7.
sausage 2/6d. biscuits 1/6d Star newspaper 3d. tea 1/2lb 1/5d 1962 Great gale of Sheffield cost £5 million damage.1962 rates 26/- in the pound.
and more topical in 1924 there was a tropical thunderstorm which was the worst on record.The calendar contains so much more such as old pictures and prices going back even further.

Timbuck
01-07-2007, 18:38
I had a load of old coins stashed away.. So I got some out to show the Grandkids...I got one of them to put a £1 worth of old pennies in his pocket (all 240 of them) he had to hold onto his belt to stop his trousers coming down...I was supprised how heavy they were compared to todays pennies.

Janner
01-07-2007, 19:42
I joined the R.N. in Oct 1949 I was 16 yrs 11mths old. My daily rate of pay was 1/6 (71/2 p). At the age of 17 it rose to 4/-. Just before joining my pocket money was 2/6 per week from that I saved enough for a week at Blackpool with my mates. Entry to Bramhall Lane & Owlerton was 1/6 for OAP's & service men in uniform. At the end of the war I queued for four hours to buy a pair of football boots, I can't remember how much they cost .

*_ash_*
01-07-2007, 23:42
<snip>

Nice post. The site is interesting. In fact all the information that I was looking for last year when I started this thread.

Have a look at the second site again, and on the first page there is a money conversion table. I know pence was a 'd', but look closely, 9d is listed as 9p. Is that a typo? or just another silliness of confusing old money:hihi:

*_ash_*
25-07-2007, 16:23
I thought I'd complete this thread as I have a few days off work.

This is to compare what you could buy with your weekly wage in 1950 and 2007.

*All the sources are at the bottom.


In 1950 it would take 164 weeks to buy a house (just over 3 years).....In 2007 it will take 495 weeks (over 9 and a half years)
In 1950 it would take 96 weeks to buy a car.....In 2007 it will take 37 weeks
In 1950 you could buy 43 packs of ciggys.....In 2007 you can buy 48 packs
In 1950 you could buy 40 gallons of petrol.....In 2007 you can buy 61 gallons of unleaded
In 1950 you could buy 31 cinema tickets.....In 2007 you can visit 49 times
In 1950 you could buy 122 Mars Bars.....In 2007 you can buy 747 bars
In 1950 you could use the tram 305 times.....In 2007 you can use the Supertram 153 times
In 1950 you could buy 76 pints of beer.....In 2007 you can buy 107 pints


:)

Anyone who has taken part in the thread, or any new ones can let me know and I can add some more/ or correct any mistakes.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
*SOURCESThe average wage was calculated by comparing Policeman/Factory Worker/Tram Driver in 1950 and Policeman/Call Centre Telephonist/Tram Driver in 2007.
The house price was an average of a 3 bed semi/2 bed terr in 1950, and same for 2007.
Car was Ford Anglia vs Ford Fiesta.
Online sources:
http://www.whatprice.co.uk/financial/housing-market/house-prices.html
http://www.moneysorter.co.uk/calculator_inflation.html
http://www.tesco.com/todayattesco/pricecheck.shtml
http://www.brandnewford.co.uk/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/in_depth/uk_house_prices/html/cg.stm
http://www.supertram.net/ticketinformation.html
And of course the posts in here!
EDIT:typos

*_ash_*
31-07-2007, 01:46
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ooops

hillsbro
31-07-2007, 07:36
Chip shop prices, 1957 - fish 8d., chips 3d, fish cake 3d. (8d ≈ 3½p, 3d = 1¼p) A small bar of Cadbury's "Dairy Milk" chocolate was 6d (2½p), and a "Milky Way" or "Wagon Wheel" 3d. In 1952 my dad bought a 3-bedroom terraced house in Dykes Hall Road for £600. It was sold to the council in 1981 for £5000, and then demolished.

dabber
25-05-2009, 08:22
Good morning Ash
I am going to write my life story, mainly for daughter and grandchildren.
Now since my life has been particularly boring and fairly uneventful I have decided to do it along the lines of a chronological journey from 1945 until whenever.
So I think what will be interesting is what normal working class earned and what they spent their hard earned cash on.
Although I was born and brought up in Crewe (yes the railway town) I would imagine that there are loads of similarities with Sheffield. Northern industrial town based on one industry
I want to know what the ‘old man earned’ as a fitter in the North Sheds? How much he would ‘tip up’ to me mam and what the money was spent on. Four kids (all boys!) and a council house to run.
My aim is to plot, year on year, the cost of the basics (ale, fags, chips and a season ticket to the Alex etc.) I will also document the changes and development of the local areas. Add to this, what and when I did things, will personalise it.
I decided to Google a few things, and to be perfectly honest found it next door to useless. Obviously my search technique was not very good.
Eventually I ended up on your site, which is very interesting and I do believe that you seem to be trying to find the same things as me. So is it possible for you to share your findings with me?
My plan is to set up a spread sheet with all of the common items down the left and across the top years from 1945 till ongoing. Is this something that you are doing?
Just to round this off I’m also looking for photographs to illustrate what we, as kids, were doing.
i.e. how we played, what we wore, what school was like, can anyone help with this either with photos or anywhere on the web to find, or books with info in?
I think that’s it from me for now
Thanks in advance for any help received
Dabber

carosio
25-05-2009, 12:00
About 1955-58 I think car road tax was £15, less for 3-wheelers, M/cycle combos and solos. As late as 1971 we were paying only 8/6d per week for an old 2 bedroom house at Walkley.

willybite
08-07-2009, 18:29
About 1955-58 I think car road tax was £15, less for 3-wheelers, M/cycle combos and solos. As late as 1971 we were paying only 8/6d per week for an old 2 bedroom house at Walkley.

hiya just read your post,my mum and dad were paying rent 6s 8d rates inc in 1961 for a house on bath street in broomhall ( when we bought our first house in 1962 ,my wife and me were to pay £3 10s 0d per year rates and water)some of the prices on the above posts really serprised me e.g chocolate the first i saw was in1947 when my dad came back after spending 5 years in the army i remember he had a suitcase and it was half full of continental bars of chocolate, he gave our neighbours kids some and most of them wondered what they were (i was 9YEARS old at the time)in fact around this time, maybe a year before, a school mate his name was peter searles brought a banana to school, and the teacher asked the class to get their drawing books out and she put the banana on her desk for us to draw. when the time came to eat it, he had no end of kids asking for the skin, the same was with apples "save the core for me" they would say, this was how it was around that time. as for cigarettes unless you knew the shopkeeper you couldn't buy them(only black market).
around 1950 the first boiled ham was on sale the price was per quarter lb
1s11d nearly 10p decimal in 1954 a packet of 10 woodbines cigs was 1s 4d.around 1954 there were very few people buying 20a pack of cigs as they were nearly the price of three pints of beer.
in 1957 a pint of beer was 1s 1d mild 1s 2d bitter,tetley's,were they the good old day's? i think not mind you i lived through it all ,not read it in a book, i've said before in other posts some people have trouble remembering the 80s and 90s

p s the cost at football 1968 was nearer 1s11d standing behind the goal at the lane.
in 1971/2 i took my son and his cousin to hillsborough we went on terrace it was half a crown for me and 1s 6d for the boys.in 1956/7 my parents bought me a birthday, and a christmas gift each year of a new suit the cost was £16. each. the cost of a shirt with cut away collar was£1.10s od. a slim-jim tie was 15s 0d. the cloth the suits were in windowpane check, over check.cheapest shoes were £2 19s 11d(all leather).in 1960 i bought a pair of shoes for£5 0s 0d at the time it was half my weeks wage (i only did it to impress my girlfriend).

cheza
25-01-2011, 03:00
I have a receipt for a Singer Treadle Sewing machine on a wooden stand,
which my mother bought in Yorkshire in August 1947 for the sum of £23.18.6.
My parents bought their 3 bedroomed terraced house in Yorkshire in 1948,
and it cost just under a thousand pounds.

mikeG
25-01-2011, 13:04
My parents moved to Stephen Hill Rd., Crosspool in 1947 and the semi cost £1950.