View Full Version : Local dialect of sheffield


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tricia888
29-04-2007, 07:29
I always found the word 'coat' was a good indicator of where someone came from in or around Sheffield. If they pronounced it 'cooat', they were from Sheffield proper, if they pronouced it 'coit', they were from out of town.

In Barnsley you put on your "coit"

Gangan
29-04-2007, 10:00
In Barnsley you put on your "coit"

Sheffield..school..scoil,or scosh
Baah..nsley..foot..fooit
and..

I'm going down to Stairfoot shops..Am barn dahn fooit:|

Vasquez Rich
29-04-2007, 11:39
You can spot someone from Barnsley dead easy..

Fohty - 40
Laikin' - playing (actually a scandinavian word and probably a hangover from the Vikings)

and from Sheffield by making two syllables out of one.. coat coo-at, mean me-an, dead dee-ad, as in the old '70s joke, why have Sheffield United only got 10 men.. cos one of 'ems a Dearden.

tricia888
29-04-2007, 20:28
EEEE! init grand !! All this teks me back to wen ah were a babby.

Me Ma used to allus be lookin o'er garden waul nosyin'

An if 'er in yard towd her owt she dint believe she'd shreeek " eeeh well I'll gu to foot o' our stairs!"

'avin' a bath int front o' fire wer'n't reeet gud cus watter were allus cowd and not reet clean if tha were yungen o' ten!!

bigcheese
02-05-2007, 15:07
I so agree!

I didn't realise it was a colloquelism rather than english - I think the word is brill!

When i used it in Oz - I also got some funny looks - they had no idea what it meant and I found it so hard to explain without using the word 'mardy' again!

Out here the closest word to replace mardy would be 'sooky' - which doesn't quite hit the spot for me :)

I've never heard of "sooky", but if I had to explain what mardy meant I would say it is when someone has got t'monk on.

Anyone know where that phrase originates?:huh:

glitterbug
02-05-2007, 23:26
Sorry LaceCurtains for the late reply, my dad used the phrase trazzing in the 60's. Reading this thread has reminded me of so many phrases and words from my childhood, it's brilliant. The post by bigcheese has started a new train of thought on meanings for being p**sed off. Got the nark on, got the face on, got the kite on, taken the hump, loads more i cant remember just now. Where do they all come from?

Plain Talker
03-05-2007, 07:27
Sorry LaceCurtains for the late reply, my dad used the phrase trazzing in the 60's. Reading this thread has reminded me of so many phrases and words from my childhood, it's brilliant. The post by bigcheese has started a new train of thought on meanings for being p**sed off. Got the nark on, got the face on, got the kite on, taken the hump, loads more i cant remember just now. Where do they all come from?

the ones I can think of off the top of my head are:-

"Got 't' monk on",

"Got 't' dolls on",

"Tekkin' 't' nark"

"Got 't' cob on"

Gangan
03-05-2007, 11:21
'In the doldrums'

Plain Talker
03-05-2007, 17:48
'In the doldrums'

hmmmm... *she muses...*

wonder if that phrase is what the above phrase I mentioned came from?

"Got 't' dolls on",

Gangan
03-05-2007, 20:33
Doldrums..means..

Area of low atmospheric pressure along the Equator, in the intertropical convergence zone where the northeast and southeast trade winds converge. The doldrums are characterized by calm or very light winds, during which there may be sudden squalls and stormy weather. For this reason the areas are avoided as far as possible by sailing ships.

So, if you are in the 'doldrums' we all need to avoid you!:hihi:

JenC
04-05-2007, 12:49
Where did the word 'Yonks' come from.

Is it a shortened version of 'Donkey's Years'.

You seldom here it these days.

Happy Days!

No idea where yonks came from but Im only 18 and I use it a lot. It's a shame more young people aren't using local colloquialisms (although i dont know if yonks is just a sheffield term).

Anyone know if "blumin 'eeley'" is only a sheffield phrase?

Vasquez Rich
04-05-2007, 23:04
the ones I can think of off the top of my head are:-

"Got 't' monk on",

"Got 't' dolls on",

"Tekkin' 't' nark"

"Got 't' cob on"

Cue another joke only funny in Sheffield.. what's black and white and moans?.. A nun wit Monk on! hahahahahaha

artisan
04-05-2007, 23:09
Cue another joke only funny in Sheffield.. what's black and white and moans?.. A nun wit Monk on! hahahahahaha

May your sins be forgiven you :hihi:

jeremyjh1
04-12-2007, 18:51
The best phrase I ever heard when I moved up to Sheffield (20 odd years ago) was someone accusing me of 'having a face on'.

Absolutely the best colloquial term ever.

mat1978
04-12-2007, 20:46
The best phrase I ever heard when I moved up to Sheffield (20 odd years ago) was someone accusing me of 'having a face on'.

Absolutely the best colloquial term ever.

having theface on :P

PopT
04-12-2007, 21:51
bigcheese

I have always wondered about the origins of two words used locally one is mardy and the other is Manker.

Mardy always implied someone was soon upset.

Manker was a man or woman who was having sex out of wedlock.

My guess is that mardiy came from Mahdi the crazy leader of the Fuzzy Wuzzy's.

Manker sounds to me like a French word probably brought back from the WW1 but it is only a guess.

Come on you lexicographers let's be hearing from you.

Happy Days!

hillsbro
05-12-2007, 09:32
How about SKERRICK? My mum would say "there isn't a skerrick o' coil in t' cellar". I've never heard this away from Sheffield.

Treatment
05-12-2007, 09:46
having theface on :P
. . .or having a Blog on.

retep
05-12-2007, 12:23
How about SKERRICK? My mum would say "there isn't a skerrick o' coil in t' cellar". I've never heard this away from Sheffield.

Skirrick--a trifling coin.

caronlel
05-12-2007, 12:47
Not realy just a Sheff thing, but I saw the other night of the meaning of
when someone says to you "Sleep Tight" anyone know?


I thought this had something to do with safeguarding yourself against the body snatchers...... maybe not then :hihi:

algy
05-12-2007, 14:10
Causey is very old, from the French 'Chausee' meaning a road. Long Causeway, the route along the ridge between Rivelin and Porter valleys and over Stanage Edge is properly called Long Causey.

Texas
05-12-2007, 18:41
I always thought to 'mank' meant to fool around. Why? Because it came from the French word 'manque', meaning comic actor. Something like that anyhow.

PopT
05-12-2007, 19:26
Texas

Don't you think having sex out of wedlock is not fooling around?

Thanks for the French word ,it seems to fit the bill.

Happy Days!

soft ayperth
06-12-2007, 01:46
A recent scene in our house. Sat watching an episode of Coronation Street (I confess to being an addict), I turned to my wife (who is not an ex Sheffielder) and I said of Fred the butcher: "'Eez popped his clogs." She had no idea what I meant. When I told her, she thought it so hilarious that she went around telling her friends about this quaint English expression for someone dying. "Poppin' one's clogs." We used it all the time when I was growing up.

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 08:52
"Popping his clogs" presumably because when someone died their next-of-kin would pawn his shoes (clogs) for money. Another phrase is "Cocking hs tooers up" perhaps meaning that when a person was laid out their toes would be pointing skywards i.e. laying on their backs?

Another term I remember my grandmother using at this time of the year was "spiced looaf " meaning Christmas cake.

Duffem

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 08:56
Someone mentioned in Barnsley coat= coyt well, in the early 1970's my husband was manager of a tailors in Barnsley and a customer came in asking for " a leet coyt" , my husband had to ask a local staff member what he meant, apparently it was " a light coloured coat".

Duffem

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 09:22
dowker uk

We have always used the word 'coke' to describe an apple core, at school just after the war we used to share apples and we always said,

"Ar bags apple coke whjen tha's done wee it!"

The wiord was used to descrbe the old grinding wheel cores that had worn down so much they couldn't be used for grinding.

These cokes were used as weights on the belt systems that drove the grinding wheels and also on the Bullstakes that were used to switch the belts across on and off the drive pulleys.

Happy Days!

My grandfather was a "dry stone grinder", I've watched him many an hour with all the sparks flying, no safety goggles or protective clothing, just sitting astride his "hoss" with the stone whipping round at an amazing speed.
One day we'd been fooling around whilst he was grinding and when we got home he told my grandmother that we'd been "magin abaht all day, we wunt geeoer, if he'd hed to tell us once he'd hed to tell us three bl**dy times, an another thing, they've been tying cokes to mi belt", it became a family phrase after that, when anyone got angry it would be followed up with that phrase.

Duffem

beady
06-12-2007, 09:51
Our owd fella allus used to say 'put wood int 'oil' - close the door, 'strike a leet', - switch on a light, 'it'll fit carneera', - stretching clothes/clobber, 'up to fetlocks in claggit' - mucked up, 'back o' fosters' - out in the sticks - mind you he allus used to say if he's bigger than thee, half a brick makes up for it!

hillsbro
06-12-2007, 10:07
Another term I remember my grandmother using at this time of the year was "spiced looaf " meaning Christmas cake.

My grandma also used the phrase "spiced looaf" but not for Christmas cake - she used to bake her own "spiced looaves". They were a sweet kind of bread with things added such as candied peel and raisins. She also made delicious Sally Lunns...

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 10:55
My grandmother used to send me on errands but, always used the phrase" I'll let ya gu tut shops fo mi".
She always used to ask me to "pan mi new shoes in fo mi", incidentally she wore size 4 and a half and I wore a size 4 so, there I'd be "gooin tut shops for er, slurrin mi feet so as to keep er shoes on my feet as they wa too big".

mun = must, as in "tha mun do it fo thissen ( do it yourself ).

geeoer wi thi = if someone said something which the other person didn't agree with.

bobbar = Blackburn Meadows was "a bobbar pumping station".

rooard = road.

Edmund Rooard Drilloyl = Edmund Road Drill Hall.

Woodheead = Woodhead, over the Pennines.

stooave = cooker

dampin t'fire aht = laying some material on the fire to keep it in overnight.

beer bottle bottoms = heavy lenses in spectacles.

allus = always.

rooap = a piece of rope thrown over a gassy (lamppost ) to swing on.

I could go on and I have but, I'll not "clag" the site up!

Duffem

PopT
06-12-2007, 11:26
Good stuff Duffems, your posting brought up memories of old times in Owlerton.

Let's be having some more, pal.

Happy Days!

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 11:38
cheeapskate = someone who was tight as a fishes' *rs*, mean, miserly.

du as thart teld = behave yourself

brob = to poke something, " I'll gi thi a brob int eye if tha dunt geeoer".

av teld thi once, twice three times an ah sharnt be su long afoore ah tell thi ageean!

Duffem

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 14:49
Just thought of some more:

naging = meaning pain, "back's been naging all day" etc.

screwterd = rhubarb, usually a stick of rhubarb given with some sugar in a bag.

'obbin foot= a metal shoe holding device, every home had one to do their own shoe repairs.

clooas ors= clothes horse, for airing clothes.

snerped up = when a garment had been washed or bacon over-cooked, it became smaller.

capeeard= a man wearing a cap, usually on the lines of Andy Capp.

Duffem

Puffin4
06-12-2007, 15:07
I always thought that overcooked bacon was crozzled.

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 15:45
You're right, bacon was "crozzled" when it was well-cooked but, if it was overcooked it became "snerped up" at least in our house!

Another one sprung to mind:

skerrick = as in "he hasn't got a skerrick" meaning hard up, where did that one come from?

Duffem

Plain Talker
06-12-2007, 16:24
"Crozzled" was the only way my mother would eat bacon. (verging on the Snarped-up!)

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 16:36
Another Sheffield Poem

Ar Sals Got A New Bonnet ,nowt Init Nowt Onit , Ar Sal Went To Church In Er New Bonnet , Alt People Stood Up And Staired,
Parson Stands Up An Sez This Is A Place Of Worship Not A Flower Show , Ar Sal Stands Up An Sez Thouz Gotta Bald Ead , Nowt Init Owt Onit , Wud Thou Like A Feather Outa My New Bonnet


My, it's a long time since I heard that one, brilliant, my grandmother used to say it but, I never knew the full verse so, thanks for that.

Duffem

DUFFEMS
06-12-2007, 16:38
"Crozzled" was the only way my mother would eat bacon. (verging on the Snarped-up!)

Our neighbour's lad had "snerped up" shoes after he'd fallen in the river and his mother put them in the oven to dry out, he was walking "twiddled tooed" fo weeks!!

Duffem

Puffin4
06-12-2007, 19:01
I like my bacon on the crozzled side, it seems to concentrate the flavour and, being shrunk up like, you can get a bit more in your roll. Sorry, bread cake.

I don't like it crozzled with a full English though, I prefer it like a slice of meat then, with Hendersons of course.

cartav
06-12-2007, 21:06
One that seems to have dropped out since the demise of industry..............

"'e's a bit datal, tha knows"....... from when workers could be paid for quantity (piecework) or on a daily basis ( datal). The latter were not as proficient, a bit slow.
Someone not quite with it, and not necessarily work related, was described as "datal".

And I've heard joiners talking about a piece of timber needing to be shaped to fit something off a true line as "It wants cuttin' ont' scunt". Somebody might confirm that's right!

There's a new booklet come out on Sheffield dialect. (Another one!) It's not cheap for what it is, at 3.75 for 60 small pages, and you mustn't believe everything in it is pure Sheff. EG. "Setts" are described as "cobble stones". It's not a local word and setts were never cobbles. Setts are square cut granite paving, cobbles are big pebbles wherever you go. There are others, but it's too easy to be critical. Just don't take everything as gospel and hope whoever writes the next one will take trouble to get it right.

PopT
06-12-2007, 21:33
Crozzle was the name given to the steel slag off the top of the old crucibles.

It was used for all sorts of jobs- roadmaking, tops of walls to stop people climbing over.

You ca see walls in Sheffield in various places topped with the black slag which is hard and very sharp on the hands, it contains more metal than the more modern steel slag.

So you can see why burn't bacon was called Crozzled.

Instead of building a bridge across Crookes valley it was decided to build a road on top of a bank.

This bank was a good place to dump crucible pots and crozzle from the old crucible furnaces.

The road that runs across Crookes Valley between the old Rec and Crookesmoor boating lake is made up of old crucible pots and crozzle.

Happy days!

soft ayperth
06-12-2007, 21:39
Someone mentioned "mardy." As kids, we'd often use the phrase "mardy bum." "Mardy bXXXer" was the adult version.

Here's another. I recall my mother used to say that it was "parky" outside, meaning cold, nippy. Anyone heard of this or know its origin?

cartav
09-12-2007, 10:56
Browsing through this lot makes me think that Sheff dialect ain't words so much as a local pronounciation. It's apparent that what some think of as words which are peculiar to the area are used nationwide. It's how they are pronounced which is different and it's a pity that the sounds might get lost without being recorded. EG....." Oo worrie wee?" instead of " who was he with ?" and " thant assta ?" for "thou hast not, hast thou?" are both English expressions put into local speak.

There are local words, or local interpretation of common English. I haven't seen it mentioned before in this thread, but "starved" or "starved through", meaning being cold, seems to be a Sheffield expression which is used nowhere else.

Greybeard
09-12-2007, 11:53
I haven't seen it mentioned before in this thread, but "starved" or "starved through", meaning being cold, seems to be a Sheffield expression which is used nowhere else.

It's quite common in the north-east and 'perished' with the same meaning.

Plain Talker
09-12-2007, 11:54
true, cartav, my grandma was never "cold" she was always "starved t' dee-ath!"

like Greybeard,when I'm cold, I'm usually "perished", or if it's cold outside, it will usually be "perishin'!"

rubydazzler
09-12-2007, 12:10
I'm starved to death at the moment, actually!

Some of the 'local' expressions that were in common usage 50 years ago and falling into disuse now, are just the lingering remnants of archaic speech often derived from the French word. Door 'jourm' (jambe), shelf 'cornish' (corniche) causeway 'corsey' (chaussee). Not to mention the leftovers from the Viking invasions which are also numerous in NE England.

I think we've lost a lot pf the richness and interest of language by jettisoning our local way of speech and acquiring 'estuary english' and 'jafraiken' or whatever they call it :) I speak normal northern english for general usage, but I try to use the old sayings and pronunciations when I'm with my 'own people'

Plain Talker
09-12-2007, 12:29
I'm starved, too, ruby! it's flippin perishin' here, an'all!

The mantel has always been the "cornish" in our house, too, ruby.

We also use the Norse "plural" too, as in shoon for shoes, and "yourn" for yours.

If we were forbidden to do something, it was "y' moant" or "y' wain't". we frequently got "ah telled yer, yer moant gu down thee-er!" or "Yer moant go askin yer uncle fred fer spice!"

trips
09-12-2007, 15:10
I think Mardy came from the Sudan,if you read Kipling he wrote that the Mahdi were the only ones to break the British square. In other words a spoilsport.
When I first left Sheffield i thought everybody but them posh people on the BBC all spoke like me until I was called up in 1947 to Pontefract and up comes a Geordie and asks me a question, what did tha se? he repeated the question, a don't know what that torking abaht. It turns out he was asking me where the NAAFI was. I was transferred to the Northumberland Fuseliers from the York and Lancs and sent to Gibraltar where I learned fluent Geordie.

Anyone know what a chebble is?

Aye, it's a geordie table

soft ayperth
09-12-2007, 15:34
Is "causey," ie. "causeway" still used to refer to the walking path alongside a road, i.e. "pavement" in Britain. I found it confusing when I moved to Canada. A "causeway" over here is a man-made strip of land used as a public thoroughfare connecting two land masses across a body of water. The term "pavement" refers to the road surfacing and the British "pavement" is a "sidewalk."

rubydazzler
09-12-2007, 16:36
rogG - only us benighted older people tend to know the old words these days, innit? A causeway is also a strip of pavement over water here too.

Anyway going back to the use of 'starved/starving' to mean cold ... this is the same meaning and this is Burns.
'Hap me wi' thy Petticoat'
Verse 1:
'O Bell, thy looks have kill'd my heart,
I pass the day in pain,
When night returns, I feel the smart
And wish for thee in vain.
I'm starving cold whilst thou art warm,
Have pity and incline,
And grant me for a hap
that Charming petticoat of thine.'

soft ayperth
09-12-2007, 17:44
Ruby dazzler, maybe it's my age playing tricks with me but I was sure I remember my grandmother telling me to "stay away from' corsey's edge," referring to the pavement (=sidewalk) alongside a busy street when I was a kid. Yes, it's additional usage to a connecting strip of land over water may be universal.

I don't remember that use of the word "starved." Incidentally, someone mentioned "perishing" to refer to a bitter cold day. I've come across that usage over here, too.

Re: the weather, a "close" day is a Sheffield term, maybe more widespread in the UK, referring to a very humid or sticky day. haven't heard that one for a long while.

Texas
09-12-2007, 17:50
Trips, I had a similar experience working on a building site in Newcastle back in the late 60s.
Me and another brickie were marking the perps on a wall to keep them in line, and I was the only one who had a pencil. 'Len us thi vine' he said. I didn't get it at all, turns out that it was 'Lend me your pencil'.

cartav
09-12-2007, 19:33
All the advice on "starved" seems to confirm my thoughts that it's not the word that makes dialect as much as how it's said. What about "like" ? Not the current usage as in "She was, like, 'What?', and I was,like, Yeah!" but when used at the end of a statement such as " I've bin t' t' pub, like". I've no problem with local speak, I'm more irritated when it's transferred into normal language and used ungrammatically.

EG. "I were sat in t' 'ouse" or " 'e were stood in't kitchen" seems OK.... that's local
vernacular. "I was sat in the house" and "He was stood in the kitchen", is bad English.
(Should be sitting & standing for any who are confused). Sorry if I've upset anyone! I'm no academic, I just think it's important to speak properly at times. I can lapse into Sheff as easily as the next, and often do.

Another word comes to mind...... my mate's mother always used to say " Little devil's piking", when their budgie stuck its head round the cover of the cage. Go on! Somebody tell me "piking" for "Looking" is more widespread than I thought!

rubydazzler
09-12-2007, 19:45
Ruby dazzler, maybe it's my age playing tricks with me but I was sure I remember my grandmother telling me to "stay away from' corsey's edge," referring to the pavement (=sidewalk) alongside a busy street when I was a kid. Yes, it's additional usage to a connecting strip of land over water may be universal.
I don't remember that use of the word "starved." Incidentally, someone mentioned "perishing" to refer to a bitter cold day. I've come across that usage over here, too.
Re: the weather, a "close" day is a Sheffield term, maybe more widespread in the UK, referring to a very humid or sticky day. haven't heard that one for a long while.

I wasn't saying it wasn't used for the edge of the pavement, just that the younger people don't use it these days. Perishing and starved are all the same idea, that it's soooo cold that it could kill you, I think.
I always thought 'close' for sticky hot muggy weather was pretty much a standard term? Not actually sure :)
And 'piking' is a good one, people still say it, and 'piking off' meaning 'eyeing someone up', maybe with a view to a bit of manking later on ;)

edit: OMG! I just put 'piking' into google and you'll never guess what sort of site I ended up on .... :blush: I'm never saying that word again!:o

Plain Talker
09-12-2007, 23:10
that sounds frightening, ruby! :blush:

If someone was taking a sneaky look at something, then that'd be "piking", or if you wore your hair like Veronica Lake, you'd have one eye "piking" out through a curtain of hair.

rubydazzler
09-12-2007, 23:42
that sounds frightening, ruby! :blush:

If someone was taking a sneaky look at something, then that'd be "piking", or if you wore your hair like Veronica Lake, you'd have one eye "piking" out through a curtain of hair.

yes, quite! but try typing 'piking' into google and after you've discounted all the fishing sites ... see what you end up with :o:P:hihi:

soft ayperth
10-12-2007, 12:24
Hi, Rubydazzler. Perishing is an understatement for what we have here this morning. Minus 10 degrees not counting the windchill and very icy underfoot. I'm going to be frozen ter bone.

It's too bad some of the expressions are falling into disuse as it's part of the culture, something to preserve.

rubydazzler
11-12-2007, 22:55
Hi, Rubydazzler. Perishing is an understatement for what we have here this morning. Minus 10 degrees not counting the windchill and very icy underfoot. I'm going to be frozen ter bone. It's too bad some of the expressions are falling into disuse as it's part of the culture, something to preserve.

I agree, I might start a Society for the Preservation of Sheffield Sayings - we could have monty python style meetings and sup ale int snug or summat! But all those people that won't give in and admit that 'Greenhill' is really pronounced 'Grenill', won't be allowed to attend :hihi:

It's been pretty perishing here today an all rog, below freezing anyway - had to liberate the car from a coat of ice this morning :o.

PopT
11-12-2007, 23:07
I'm not only perished, 'I'm Klammed to Dee'ath' as they used to say in the old days.

Happy Days!

Plain Talker
11-12-2007, 23:32
I'm not only perished, 'I'm Klammed to Dee'ath' as they used to say in the old days.

Happy Days!

so long as you're not "Standin Theer like Klem!" :hihi:

Greybeard
11-12-2007, 23:37
But all those people that won't give in and admit that 'Greenhill' is really pronounced 'Grenill', won't be allowed to attend :hihi:


Well there was really only one, - what happened to him....was he banned for life or did he just give up the struggle ?

hillsbro
12-12-2007, 08:30
This reminds me of my grandfather, who pronounced "Sheffield" and "Bradfield" as "Sheff'l" and "Bradf'l".

cartav
13-12-2007, 21:04
Words keep coming to mind.......... Not seen anyone mention "Luv" yet for a response to anyone male or female. I remember thinking I was on to a good thing once, in Tyneside, when I was answered as "Pet", but I was mistaken...... It's just Geordie for Luv. And similarly, " Flower" crops up in Sheff, again for male or female. Hope that's right! I'd be narked if my sexual orientation was being questioned when I've been so addressed!

DUFFEMS
13-12-2007, 21:51
"Flower" was a Barnsley expression, it was used frequently by Charlie White, the Barnsley comedian, he used it when addressing male or female.

Regards,
Duffem

Plain Talker
13-12-2007, 22:11
who was Charlie White?

I remember Charlie Williams saying "Me owd flower" a lot...?

soft ayperth
17-12-2007, 21:02
I'll share a story relating to the Sheffield dialect. We were a family of 4, visiting Sheffield. Three of us had come over from Canada, my son we picked up en route as he had a teaching job in Essex, outside of London (where I have trouble deciphering the accent). I pulled the rental into a garage on the outskirts of Sheffield and asked my son to go inside and ask for directions to where we were headed. "Why don't you go in dad?" he said," you understand what they say around here." "Give me a break, it's not a foreign language," was my reply. Seemed funny at the time.

PopT
18-12-2007, 09:39
When I was in the states most people couldn't decipher my dialect, often I would ask for something and the shop assistant/ waitress would turn to my wife and ask her what I was saying.

Often I felt I was from another country speaking a totally different language to English.

Happy Days!

DUFFEMS
18-12-2007, 12:33
You're right "plaintalker", it was Charlie Williams, it was a senior moment I had!

Regards,
Duffem

soft ayperth
18-12-2007, 12:43
When I was in the states most people couldn't decipher my dialect, often I would ask for something and the shop assistant/ waitress would turn to my wife and ask her what I was saying.

Often I felt I was from another country speaking a totally different language to English.

Happy Days!

But communication in Glasgow has to be the biggest challenge of all all, PopT. On that same trip, in Glasgow, I walked up to the bar in a pub and ordered a pint of beer. Even allowing for my unfamiliar accent (a Sheffield/ Canadian hybrid) you'd think the possibilities of what I might be asking for were pretty limited. "I kannee underrrrrstand 'e laddie," he drawled in that syrupy, but engaging Glasgow accent. I had to point to the pumps to get my pint of beer.

hillsbro
18-12-2007, 12:47
I once ordered a pint in a Glasgow pub by asking for "a pint of bitter". The seven-foot, 25-stone barman replied "Ye mean a pint o' HEAVY!). I acquiesced...

Bushbaby
18-12-2007, 18:37
In a chippy in Farnborough this week, I asked for Fish and Chips with gravy on!!
I thought the girl serving me was gonna be sick!

Texas
18-12-2007, 18:49
We were in Brunswick, Georgia, in the U.S. once, just strolling around, and my wife said she'd like an ice cream. So me, being the accomodating spendthrift that I am, went to this Ice Cream Parlour to get a couple. The girl serving stared at me when I ordered and said something like 'Ya'll fum laids?' I'm like 'Wha.' So she repeated 'Ya'll saiound lak ya fum laids.'
Anyhow after a few more exchanges like this, I realised she was asking me if I was from Leeds. This is like asking me if I'd like my fingernails pulled out.
So I just said no, trying very hard not to go into a rant. Then came the surprise. She went into a credible South Yorkshire accent. Turns out her best friend was from Sheffield and had married a Georgia lad and she'd picked up a lot of the accent and stuff from her.
Just in case your wondering, I didn't get the ice cream for free.

Mr Sheffield
18-12-2007, 19:32
I think gennel is another word that is native to Sheffield, up here in backwards Leeds they call it a ginnel!!

hillsbro
18-12-2007, 20:17
I think gennel is another word that is native to Sheffield, up here in backwards Leeds they call it a ginnel!!

Here in North Lincs. it's a tenfoot. In the Midlands it's a snicket, and in Sussex it's a twitten.

My grandma always called the mantlepiece the "cornish", as "Plain Talker" wrote, and you still occasionally hear it in Sheffield. I've often wondered if this is a variation of "cornice".

PopT
18-12-2007, 22:43
Today, I remembered an old phrase that was used at work. (My Rememberer clicked in)

It was, 'Ah! eez bin earwigging on Mesters talking'.

it was used when one of the lads chipped into a conversation with something he had overheard.

Happy Days!

rubydazzler
18-12-2007, 23:00
Today, I remembered an old phrase that was used at work. It was, 'Ah! eez bin earwigging on Mesters talking'. it was used when one of the lads chipped into a conversation with something he had overheard.
I don't know whether this has been mentioned before, but one of the things that you found 'int gud owd dayz' were the terms of respect that have fallen into disuse "The Mester" and "The Missis". In the 50s you could call to a man or woman that you didn't know their name "excuse me Mester/Missis" without fear that you'd be thought ill mannered.

Now, what are you supposed to call a stranger "Oi, you"? "Sir", "Madam" seem overly formal and a little bit sarcastic almost? Are we the only country in the world that doesn't have an accepted way of addressing strangers?

A very old lady came into the shop last week with her grandson, and I heard her say to him "Ask t'Missus if she still keeps 200 watt bulbs in" It took me right back to childhood in an instant. A knock at the kitchen door, "Wheerz Gaffer? E int in? Can I talk tut Missis then"?

As you say Popt. Happy Days! :)

MarionC
18-12-2007, 23:58
Today I found myself telling the cat (who was in her basket ready to go to the vet) that we were going "tottaars", I don't know where that came from, but it was always used by my mum when we were small, when off on an outing!
Must be heading for my dotage :)

Marion

garethb
19-12-2007, 00:27
I don't know whether this has been mentioned before, but one of the things that you found 'int gud owd dayz' were the terms of respect that have fallen into disuse "The Mester" and "The Missis". In the 50s you could call to a man or woman that you didn't know their name "excuse me Mester/Missis" without fear that you'd be thought ill mannered.

:)

Blimy...I've been called a "mester" a few times since moving to Sheffield the last time being just a few days ago when I was at a cashpoint and the woman behind me told her kid not to go near "the mester" as I was getting my money.

It seems a very local and very working class thing. It also seems to denote a degree of respect and a quality of upbringing.

rubydazzler
19-12-2007, 00:32
Today I found myself telling the cat (who was in her basket ready to go to the vet) that we were going "tottaars", I don't know where that came from, but it was always used by my mum when we were small, when off on an outing!
Must be heading for my dotage :) Marion

I'd have written is as ta-tas, as I always thought of it as saying bye bye ... but I supposing 'tottering' woudl be equally right! :)

Did your mum say "bee-byes" for bed as well? "Going bee-byes" or was it "bye-byes"? Can't remember now!

I'm getting quite misty eyed here!

rubydazzler
19-12-2007, 00:37
It seems a very local and very working class thing. It also seems to denote a degree of respect and a quality of upbringing.

I think that's probably one of reasons it's fallen into disrepute. People think it's "common". There is a lot of false snobbery in Sheffield, maybe more so than any other place I've been in. Mostly by nouveaux it has to be said!

The meaning of Mr and Mrs is, of course, Master and Mistress, or as we say "Missis". The local pronunciation of 'mister' as "Mester" is something to do with the German metalworkers that were here in the 18th C I think - the "meisters" or master workers.

DUFFEMS
19-12-2007, 09:05
My 84 years old mother-in-law has had a cold which has left her with a "peffing cough",
she says that she "needs purrin in a bag an' shakkin aart afresh".
When she refers to departing this life she says, " Tha'll niver know thi luck 'til tha teks thi barra back".

If you tell her that she's going to live till she's a hundred she says," Geeoar wi thi, enny rooad up all be cockin me tooas up afooar then".

When she saw her great grandchild last week she said, "Gee us thi danny" ( give me your hand) an' all see if av gorrany spice fo' thi", needless to say the child was very bemused! She doesn't understand that nowadays young children are very rarely given chocolate to eat as they go "hyper" and mums can't get them to behave then. She says "a quick clip round t'lugoal's what they want".

Does anyone know why Sheffielders, when they meet, say "Nah, then" meaning "now, then" as these two words are opposites?

Duffems

Plain Talker
19-12-2007, 09:28
I'd have written is as ta-tas, as I always thought of it as saying bye bye ... but I supposing 'tottering' woudl be equally right! :)

Did your mum say "bee-byes" for bed as well? "Going bee-byes" or was it "bye-byes"? Can't remember now!

I'm getting quite misty eyed here!

Ta-tas is what members of our family used to say:- "goo-in on yer ta-tas" , and, yes, I think it comes from saying "ta-ta" far "bye bye" (though I don't know the origin of "ta-ta".

When a baby would "wave bye-bye" we'd encourage them, and say "Ah! are you waving a 'ta-ta's?"

beady
19-12-2007, 11:10
"Ahl teltheewot, tha sandslike a cannomabs wentha oppens thigob! Tha allus same whentha chimesup. That crap ont jolanna annall - allus purgin abart same tuens. That like apurtel an big girl's blouse an brastrap! Tha can goo an getnotted as faar as ahm concerned an tekthisen off darnt rooad. Ah reckon tha waants wot Maryhad - tha jus waants to shuttheeface forabit, we all sickantired onnit" Anyone want to translate - I have no end of bother when we have visitors from further afield!

DUFFEMS
19-12-2007, 11:17
I allus wonted to know what "Mary 'ad", did anyone ever find out?

Duffem

PopT
19-12-2007, 11:49
Another word you very seldom hear today in Sheffield but was common years ago was the use of the work, Hark.

Such phrases as, @ Hark at her!

Which of course was, 'Listen to her!


Happy Days!

DUFFEMS
19-12-2007, 12:04
You're right PopT, what about, "look o'er yon" meaning ,"Look over there".

My grandfather had several ditties which originated in Sheffield, one being:

Weers tha bin lad,
Selling Specials,
Who fo,
Me uncle Dick,
What's 'e gen thi,
Oni a'pnny
Skinny owd pig, he owt to dee!


Duffem

soft ayperth
19-12-2007, 13:22
When I was in the states most people couldn't decipher my dialect, often I would ask for something and the shop assistant/ waitress would turn to my wife and ask her what I was saying.

Often I felt I was from another country speaking a totally different language to English.

Happy Days!

I've lived over here for almost 40 years, PopT, so my accent is a bit of a hybrid. Nevertheless, people over here still regard it as "English" and want to know where I come from. Invariably, when I say Sheffield, they say "that's where they make knives and forks, isn't it?" When I visit Sheffield, people there often refer to me as an "American," not making the distinction between Canada and the US. I do find that during my visits to Sheffield, it doesn't take long for me to re-acquire some of the brogue.

But, I'm just looking at what Beady has written. I'm planning to write a book set in Sheffield. One of the things I'm going to have to decide is how much of the dialect to put into it. It has to be widely understood. It also has to be authentic, down to earth. Beady's given me something to ponder. I can always put a Glossary in it..a big one?

DUFFEMS
19-12-2007, 14:42
eesezzitintisburraberritis. He says it isn't his but I bet it is.

Duffem

Plain Talker
19-12-2007, 18:39
I allus wonted to know what "Mary 'ad", did anyone ever find out?

Duffem

Ah dun't know, burr'if thar't askin' questions like that, Tha wants wot Mary got! (one of my grandma's favourites:- "she wants wot Mary got")

Greybeard
19-12-2007, 19:09
A certain Mary gorrer edd chopped off !

soft ayperth
19-12-2007, 20:08
Is the word "chuff" still used in a derogatory sense in Sheffield? When I was growing up, it was a mild form of abuse.

Husband to wife: "Aw ah! it's the birthday, in it? Forgot all abart it."
Wife to husband: "Chuff!"

On the other hand, if someone is "feeling chuffed," it means feeling pleased with himself or herself.

Does this ring any bells?

Bushbaby
20-12-2007, 10:45
Does this ring any bells?
Nayew yer daft chuff

Bushbaby
20-12-2007, 10:47
I think gennel is another word that is native to Sheffield, up here in backwards Leeds they call it a ginnel!!
On The Cross we call it an "Eightfoot"

lennonman
20-12-2007, 11:00
After reading these posts yesterday i found myself watching football on the telly and screaming at the ref in my best Sheffield, 'as tha gen it then referee?' and then thinking 'gen it' refers to the giving of something as in 'as tha gen it to him/her'. my accent always comes out more watching footy, is anyone else the same?

DUFFEMS
20-12-2007, 11:03
Nayew yer daft chuff

Will tha geeore chuffin' abaht with thi. = Behave yourself!

Duffems

davided
20-12-2007, 15:54
nagh then sithey.dems monkeys
r d
i d r
r d l
d r c
i c d r and ill sithey

soft ayperth
20-12-2007, 19:37
Will tha geeore chuffin' abaht with thi. = Behave yourself!

Duffems

Seems like chuff and adjectives, adverbs etc is a pretty versatile word, meaning anything from a mild insult to feeling good to misbehaving.

My wife heard the word for the first time on Coronation Street, as one of the characters said she was "feeling chuffed." This prompted her (my wife, that is) to suggest that "Chuff" would be a good name for our next dog. "Not a good idea," I explained. Imagine if a dog were called that in Sheffield. In a crowded park, calling "'Ere chuff!" Might get into trouble.

DUFFEMS
20-12-2007, 21:18
Seems like chuff and adjectives, adverbs etc is a pretty versatile word, meaning anything from a mild insult to feeling good to misbehaving.

My wife heard the word for the first time on Coronation Street, as one of the characters said she was "feeling chuffed." This prompted her (my wife, that is) to suggest that "Chuff" would be a good name for our next dog. "Not a good idea," I explained. Imagine if a dog were called that in Sheffield. In a crowded park, calling "'Ere chuff!" Might get into trouble.
Hi rogG, the word "chuff" is not used as frequently now, usually older Sheffielders use it but, that can be said of most Sheffield words and dialect.
It's unusual to hear the Sheffield dialect now, the local dialect now is a mixture of all sorts, difficult to define it actually.

I had an uncle who never swore apart from saying "chuff" as in "silly chuff", "chuffin 'ell","chuffin about".

Duffems

PopT
20-12-2007, 23:45
RogG

If you go back in this posting you will find the subject of the word Chuff or Chough has been aired before.

Some would say it is swearing others a common harmless slang word with even one of our ministers using the word.

Happy Days!

welder1
27-12-2007, 21:17
if tha dus owt fo nowt always do it fo thi sen

soft ayperth
27-12-2007, 23:28
"Sithee" is another expression that I remember my grandad used quite a lot while I was growing up. An exclamation meaning "See here! " or "Fancy that!"

"Grandad, tha ant arf got a big belly."

"Sithee! 'eez gettin' too big fer is britches!"

Is it still used nowadays?

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 00:52
Does anyone know the origin of:
1/corsey edge
2/lamass
3/no hobbies on
4/outs
5/six foot and a gassy
6/drags
7/hit or miss run two
8/around t'lump
9/mardy
10/a face as long as Norfolk Street

I've just seen this thread (and annoyed Mrs Sundae by spending the last 3 hours reading it).

The one that particularly caught my eye was No 3 "hobbies". I'm sure my mum used this word specifically for the nails, not for the whole boot - as in "buy some hobbies for me boo-ats". They were also called segs, I think. Maybe they were different designs, and segs were the shape of an orange segment, more for shoes than boots.

I love the word spice. My dad always said spice.

I also remember him saying "ought", meaning "nought", as in ought, one, two, three etc. This was specifically when he and a mate were checking some adding up, and they both were saying ought. I don't think I've ever heard anyone else say it, but it certainly wasn't a mistake, as both of them were saying it. Has anyone else heard this?

From my mum, if I failed to hear something (or more probably if I was wilfully ignoring her) - " 'as tha got cloth ears?"

I'm surprised I had to get so far into the thread before anyone said "luv". That's got to be the definitive Sheffield word, but only any use if said by one man to another, preferably a total stranger.

I remember reading somewhere (in a series of pamphlet-type books about Sheffield, from the early 70s, IIRC), that Crookes used to have its own clear accent/dialect. Does anyone know of any books etc about this type of detail, as I think it would be interesting. Remember when the Yorkshire Ripper tapes appeared, some experts at the time supposedly identified the accent to within a small area of Sunderland - I'm wondering if that type of information is available for South Yorks. Now having thought about the Yorkshire Ripper tapes, I wonder if when they caught the man who sent the tapes, whether or not he did come from the area that had been identified. Obviously, as people now move about much more than they did, say, 50 years ago, it wouldn't work for younger people, but there are still a lot of older people who have always lived in the same area all there life, and are old enough to not have been bombarded with "foreign" influences during their formative years.

Where I now work, we have employees commuting in from as far north as Leeds, and from as far south as Nottingham. This is most noticable in the canteen - its a bloody balmcake or a breadcake, a teacake's got fruit in it!!!

...and of course we get "ducks" as well as "luvs".

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 00:56
Anyone remember the Peter Tinniswood TV Series, "I didn't know you cared"? It'd be interesting to see a repeat, to see how accurate the dialect was. It's so long ago now that I can't remember.

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 01:04
...and another point,

to my ear, and the way I speak, it's not " t'coil-oil ", it's just " 'coil-oil ". ie I don't shorten " the " to " t' ", it disappears completely

How do others hear and say "the"?

Edit. Example - " I've been daarn in 'cellar. "

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 01:11
...one from me dad, if you encounter a foul smell,

"Two sniffs at that and tha's a glutton"

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 01:12
Also me dad,

"Tha moant" = You must not

Plain Talker
28-12-2007, 02:55
...one from me dad, if you encounter a foul smell,

"Two sniffs at that and tha's a glutton"

My mother used to say something similar when my father broke wind. She'd say "Anybody that'd take two sniffs of that is a greedy *person*" (self-censored)

The other response, when the "aroma" was rather, erm... "rich" was "Take deep breaths, an' it'll soon go away."

Plain Talker
28-12-2007, 03:07
I From my mum, if I failed to hear something (or more probably if I was wilfully ignoring her) - " 'as tha got cloth ears?"

I remember reading somewhere (in a series of pamphlet-type books about Sheffield, from the early 70s, IIRC), that Crookes used to have its own clear accent/dialect. Does anyone know of any books etc about this type of detail, as I think it would be interesting. have been bombarded with "foreign" influences during their formative years.

Where I now work, we have employees commuting in from as far north as Leeds, and from as far south as Nottingham. This is most noticable in the canteen - its a bloody balmcake or a breadcake, a teacake's got fruit in it!!!

...and of course we get "ducks" as well as "luvs".

"ducks"/ mi-duck tends to be more very south Sheffield or Derby/shire, somewhat into Nottingham/shire.

And re the fruited teacake: surely, tha mea-uns a Kerrant (currant) tee-a cake! no? (well, that's more northern Sheffield / Stocksbridge/ Brnsley, to be accurate, I suppose! I was aghast, when attending Nottingham for a football match, following Shefield United, three or so years ago, calling into the Chippy, nearby to the ground, for a chip Butty, (yes naturally it'd have to be a greasy one LOL) and being told by the staff it was a "chip-cob". they didn't comprehend chip butty! ( *look of total astonishment*)

Cob? Cob? a COB??? a cob's what you get, on your head, when you bang it, for goodness sake! ( :lol: )

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 10:44
"ducks"/ mi-duck tends to be more very south Sheffield or Derby/shire, somewhat into Nottingham/shire.

And re the fruited teacake: surely, tha mea-uns a Kerrant (currant) tee-a cake! no? (well, that's more northern Sheffield / Stocksbridge/ Brnsley, to be accurate, I suppose! I was aghast, when attending Nottingham for a football match, following Shefield United, three or so years ago, calling into the Chippy, nearby to the ground, for a chip Butty, (yes naturally it'd have to be a greasy one LOL) and being told by the staff it was a "chip-cob". they didn't comprehend chip butty! ( *look of total astonishment*)

Cob? Cob? a COB??? a cob's what you get, on your head, when you bang it, for goodness sake! ( :lol: )

I think it was usually just teacake, when I was young. "kerrant" teacake is (to me) a later term, to differentiate it from a "plain" tea cake (ie a bread cake).

Something else I remember as a kid (late 50s, early 60s) is going to pie & pea suppers at social events. It was always a hot pork pie (with the jelly melted) and peas. Later on, it seemed to change to steak and kidney pie.

Also, shops now sell crumpets. When I was a kid, these were called pikelets. They still are pikelets in my mind, and I have to translate before speaking so that people understand me. There was even a shop on South Road, that everyone called the pikelet shop, which made them on the premises. I remember discussing these on another forum. Apparently, around Stoke way, pikelets are cooked without a ring and so come out flatter. The pikelet shop on South Road also made oatcakes - we used to have them with breakfasts, fried in dripping - Ah, the food of the gods. Does anywhere still sell oatcakes?

hillsbro
28-12-2007, 13:48
You can get oatcakes at Funk's pork butchers in Hillsborough - I think they are 40p for a packet of four. Delicious with a fried egg on top. They are just like the oatcakes that used to be sold at Mr Moule's pikelet shop just across Middlewood Road until the 1960s. There's a fine drawing of the shop in Eric Leslie's book "Oatcakes, Pikelets and Sarsparilla".

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 14:31
You can get oatcakes at Funk's pork butchers in Hillsborough - I think they are 40p for a packet of four. Delicious with a fried egg on top. They are just like the oatcakes that used to be sold at Mr Moule's pikelet shop just across Middlewood Road until the 1960s. There's a fine drawing of the shop in Eric Leslie's book "Oatcakes, Pikelets and Sarsparilla".

Thanks for that. I don't know Hillsborough very well (basically limited to driving through between Malin Bridge and Penistone Road). Can you tell me where Funk's is please?

Yes, I agree, great with a fried egg.

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 15:09
What about "while" meaning "until" and not "during".

as in "I'll wait while he comes".

Is this just local?

hillsbro
28-12-2007, 16:46
Funk's is at 65 Middlewood Road, just before the corner of Dykes Hall Road. You may need to go early in the day as they sometimes sell out. Enjoy!

Plain Talker
28-12-2007, 17:51
<snippitty>
The term "crumpets" and "Pikelets" is used interchangeably, but there's a bit of a difference between the two.

A crumpet is smaller than a pikelet. A crumpet is about the diameter of a coffee mug, a pikelet is a bit larger, more like the diameter of an oatcake, but not as thin, it's more like the thickness of the crumpet.

All three are delicious.

As a sweet treat, have you ever tried apple sauce, smeared, thinly on a rolled-up hot buttered oatcake? Tasty!

Eater Sundae
28-12-2007, 18:06
The term "crumpets" and "Pikelets" is used interchangeably, but there's a bit of a difference between the two.

A crumpet is smaller than a pikelet. A crumpet is about the diameter of a coffee mug, a pikelet is a bit larger, more like the diameter of an oatcake, but not as thin, it's more like the thickness of the crumpet.

All three are delicious.

As a sweet treat, have you ever tried apple sauce, smeared, thinly on a rolled-up hot buttered oatcake? Tasty!

As I remember pikelets from the Pikelet shop on South Road, they were bigger than modern day packaged crumpets, but not by much, and nowhere near the diameter of an oatcake. Are the pikelets you are describing cooked within a ring to control the diameter and maintain the height, or are they free to spread out like an oatcake?

Texas
28-12-2007, 18:25
...and another point,

to my ear, and the way I speak, it's not " t'coil-oil ", it's just " 'coil-oil ". ie I don't shorten " the " to " t' ", it disappears completely

How do others hear and say "the"?

Edit. Example - " I've been daarn in 'cellar. "
When the 'the' disapears but is still there, is known as a 'glottal stop'.
The thing that really annoys me is when you get these actors, on radio and television, using a so called authentic Yorkshire accent and saying things like 'in t' oil' and 'on t' floor', stuff like that. And just as bad is when they say (to use your example) 'dahn in cellar', not even attempting a stop of any kind.
There must be an opening for some enterprising person to set him or herself up as a Yorkshire language teacher.

PopT
29-12-2007, 13:21
Years ago the pikelet shop was fair opposite to Funks on Hillsborough.

I think it is the Barnardo's Charity Shop now.

As well as making pikelets and Oatcakes they also made Milkcakes.

Does anyone else remember all these being made on a hotplate behind the counter where you could watch them being made?

Did you know that Havercakes (the old name for oatcakes) were brought into Yorkshire by the Vikings.

There was a Yorkshire regiment who used dried oatcakes (Havercakes) as their marching rations and guess what they carried them in a bag called a haversack.

The recruiting Sergeants used to go through the towns and villages with an Oatcke tied with regimental coloured ribbon to his sword.

The soldiers were always called the 'Haverboys'.

I hope this was of some interest? I do have more if anyone wants to drop me a PM and I will post it back.

Happy Days!

hillsbro
29-12-2007, 17:24
Years ago the pikelet shop was fair opposite to Funks on Hillsborough ... as well as making pikelets and Oatcakes they also made Milkcakes. Does anyone else remember all these being made on a hotplate behind the counter where you could watch them being made?

Yes indeed - and this is the scene depicted in Eric Leslie's drawing in "Oatcakes, Pikelets and Sarsparilla". I imagine the drawing is copyrighted or I would scan it and give a link to Photobucket, but the text reads "There, in full view of the street, was a large flat metal plate kept very hot. Every few seconds a man with an apron (i.e. Mr Moule) would pour a measure of creamy mixture on. There, it would sizzle noisily before being deftly turned over to sizzle on the other side until picked up and served on a piece of grease-proof paper."

PopT
29-12-2007, 20:40
Another expression that was used was,'to touch somebody.',meaning 'to borrow money'.

But if you were, 'to touch somebody up' was to touch somebody in a sexual manner

What a Memory, these days it blows in as fast as it blows out.

Happy Days!

archaeobard
30-12-2007, 13:41
Of course, the great thing about "Mardy" is that it is now immortalised in song by the Arctic Monkeys, so kids in USA, Australia and Japan will be asking the question "What on earth is a Mardy Bum?"


I am originally from Australia and I have always known what the term 'mardy bum' meant, way before Arctic Monkeys, although personally I would say 'mardy a*se'. If this is a Sheffield thing then I am confused because my father is from Nottingham. Is this term wider than Sheffield?

AB

hillsbro
30-12-2007, 16:38
The word "mardy" isn't confined to Sheffield and can be heard all over the Midlands. This website suggests that Sheffield is at the northern end of the area in which the word is used: http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A769250

Texas
30-12-2007, 18:05
I suppose everybody who still lives in England has seen the Jamie Oliver ad on TV, the one where he says 'Just give it a good wazz.' It just kills me that one, when we were at Pye Bank we used to try and p*** as high up the toilet wall as we could, it was known as 'wazzing'.
Another expression I dont think has been mentioned is 'grufted', meaning ingrained muck on a collar, or, indeed, any surface.

mrsmills
31-12-2007, 10:42
That's interesting, I would have thought everyone Midlands north (up to the Borders) would have come across the word 'mardy' and heard it in us in their area.

To a non-Sheffielder this is really fascinating. Sheffield Uni. had a project compiling all these words and identifying when they were first used and where, I'm not sure if the project is still on-going but it would be good to get these words and phrases recorded permanently as it seems even if accents are pretty stable things, dialects are under threat.

As a non-Sheffielder, I detect the slightest glottal stop in some speakers with a stronger accent, but it is only slight, nothing like the supposedly accurate accents you hear on television and radio.

DUFFEMS
31-12-2007, 11:01
That's interesting, I would have thought everyone Midlands north (up to the Borders) would have come across the word 'mardy' and heard it in us in their area.

To a non-Sheffielder this is really fascinating. Sheffield Uni. had a project compiling all these words and identifying when they were first used and where, I'm not sure if the project is still on-going but it would be good to get these words and phrases recorded permanently as it seems even if accents are pretty stable things, dialects are under threat.

As a non-Sheffielder, I detect the slightest glottal stop in some speakers with a stronger accent, but it is only slight, nothing like the supposedly accurate accents you hear on television and radio.

Way back in the 1960's my grandfather was interviewed by someone from Sheffield Uni. who was starting to compile information about Sheffield dialect, I believe his name to be John Widdowson ( I may be wrong ), I don't know what happened to his work, maybe it was part of a study in his work.

Regards,
Duffems

hillsbro
31-12-2007, 14:15
John Widdowson is the author of a number of books on dialects. He co-wrote (with G. Edward Campion) the little book "Lincolnshire Dialects" which enabled me to understand some of the local words that I hear, now that I live in Lincolnshire. Some Sheffield dialect words and phrases can be heard here, such as "mardy", "owd, and "Geeo'er ruwerin", but the locals were as mystified when I referred to "tranklements" as I was by such Lincolnshire words as "dacker", "proggle" and "clat".

sweetdexter
02-01-2008, 01:03
Answers given to enquisitive children.
"How old are you mam?"
" As old as my tongue and a bit older than my teeth"
"How much did that cost?"
"Money and fair words"
Whether these are Sheffield sayings i don't know ,but they were two of my mothers favourite sayings

hillsbro
02-01-2008, 08:44
My Sheffield grandma's favourite answer to a child asking
"what are you doing?",
was
"peggin' a rug!"

Plain Talker
02-01-2008, 11:33
Answers given to enquisitive children.
"How old are you mam?"
" As old as my tongue and a bit older than my teeth"
"How much did that cost?"
"Money and fair words"
Whether these are Sheffield sayings i don't know ,but they were two of my mothers favourite sayings

we certainly must have had the same mum, dexter! My mother used those sayings too. although she used to say it as "money in fair words"

Jinx
02-01-2008, 22:01
Does anybody know the rest of the rhyme containing these lines usually used when first footin' on New Years Eve/Day

Happy New Year
Happy New Year

A horse and a gig and a good fat pig to serve us all next year

Hole in my pocket
Hole in my shoe
Please can you spare me a penny or two
If you haven't got a penny
An 'apenny will do
If you haven't got an 'apenny, then God bless you

I think there was a line in there about a pocket foll of money and a cellar full of beer???

Plain Talker
02-01-2008, 23:51
Does anybody know the rest of the rhyme containing these lines usually used when first footin' on New Years Eve/Day

Happy New Year
Happy New Year

A horse and a gig and a good fat pig to serve us all next year

Hole in my pocket
Hole in my shoe
Please can you spare me a penny or two
If you haven't got a penny
An 'apenny will do
If you haven't got an 'apenny, then God bless you
I think there was a line in there about a pocket foll of money and a cellar full of beer???

that last part of the bit of the rhyme you quoted, I know coming from this rhyme:-

Christmas is coming, the Goose is getting fat
Please to put a penny in the old man's hat
If you haven't got a penny
An 'apenny will do
If you haven't got an 'apenny, then God bless you

nanrobbo
03-01-2008, 02:30
Does anybody know the rest of the rhyme containing these lines usually used when first footin' on New Years Eve/Day

Happy New Year
Happy New Year

A horse and a gig and a good fat pig to serve us all next year

Hole in my pocket
Hole in my shoe
Please can you spare me a penny or two
If you haven't got a penny
An 'apenny will do
If you haven't got an 'apenny, then God bless you



I think there was a line in there about a pocket foll of money and a cellar full of beer???
I think it goes
HNY HNY
A pocket fulla money and a barrel fulla beer
Horse and a gig and a big fat pig to serve us all next year
then - Hole in my p.....etc

nanrobbo
03-01-2008, 02:34
My Sheffield grandma's favourite answer to a child asking
"what are you doing?",
was
"peggin' a rug!"
My Mum's answer's were:
Knitting a vest for Cecil!
Cat while't kettle boils :hihi:
White weshin't cellar ( we didn't have a cellar)

gracie
03-01-2008, 17:04
i think drags means to inhale on a cigarette (as in give us a
drag) and bobbar means to go to the toilet and have a number 2!,

PopT
05-01-2008, 17:20
When we were kids we'd get a 'scutch at the back of the neck' if we were naughty.

I wonder if that phrase was only used in this area?

Happy Days!

DUFFEMS
05-01-2008, 18:46
And a "clipped lugoile", I wonder what to clip means, we all know the result as we've probably all had one but, as you say PopT, scutched must be Sheffieldeze!

What about "brob". Such as, "If tha dunt geeoer all brob thee int eye"

Duffems

buttercup
05-01-2008, 20:12
I have live in sheffield all my life. I think it depends on where you grew in sheffield as to how you talk. My dad speaks what I call proper Sheffield talk. I have friends who ask me sometimes what I mean when I turn on the Sheffield talk, I love it and I'm proud of it. Me and my husband were reading the thread and thinking of our fav sayings,
mine - "wots tha want for thee tee"
"owt" wor is dey"
"S**t wi sugar on"

his - gee or, ya mardy arse git

hillsbro
07-01-2008, 16:17
Regarding posts #410 and 413 on this thread, here is an "oatcake report" after returning, oatcake-laden, from Hillsborough:
Funk's - packs of 4 oatcakes, 50p
Parkin's Pantry (in the Hillsborough Shopping Centre, alias the "arcade") - packs of 4 oatcakes, 40p.
Oatcakes are also evidently sold at Bilton's
They are delicious - enjoy!

pwilson6466
10-01-2008, 18:28
Twas 1983, Tinsley, visiting my nan........

"Na then lad, ah thy alreight?"
"ah lass, ah tha?"
"Well tha knows lad? Weers thee fatha isee goin t'asda toneet?"
"ah afinkso"
"will thy askim to gerrus sum meyt fot dog? arr caffrin wer supoas t be fetchin us sum rawnd burriant seener, mind thee she might beerawnd int mornin, thats if that creypin jeysus ul'gerrawntnis pit, the bleeder! does tha no, ad belt imrawnd bloody earoil iffee wer mine!"...

..."as thy ad thee supper lad or does tha wanna go'ovver chip oil and gethee sen summat? OOoo owdon, adduntno wether its oppen, tharrad berrer go,ovver n find awt, afink towd lad might be on olladi!"....

...."nayow lass is norroppen"
"arrees gon ovver t'skeggy fo't week. Tharralafta go dawn dundas rooad, thatten elbe oppen"
"ay alreight lass, does tha want owt?"
"no am alreight lad, mind thee thallafta go long way rawnd cos parkie il avlocked rec bi nah!".............

Brim
08-03-2008, 21:27
My, it's a long time since I heard that one, brilliant, my grandmother used to say it but, I never knew the full verse so, thanks for that.

Duffem

My nana taught us a slightly different version, perhaps between us all we could find the whole rhyme.

Ar Sals gorra new bonnet
wi red roses reet rarnd brim
an a feather reet up back
Ar Sal went to chirch in it
parsen sez Sal, Sal
this is a place a warship norra flar shor
Sal sez bald ed nowt in it nowt on it
duz tha wanna a feather from ma bonnet to puronit.

She also taught us 'Little Jim' I did find that on poeticportal.net

hillsbro
09-03-2008, 11:26
My dad's favourite examples of Sheffield dialect were:

"Are ter gooin' ooam toneet, or are tha stoppin' ere?" ...and the old one:

"Darn t'Wicker weer t'watter runs o'er t'weer"

As for words grouped together: "supwidee?" and "gerritetten" are my own favourites.

The Miller
09-03-2008, 14:57
My dad's favourite examples of Sheffield dialect were:

"Are ter gooin' ooam toneet, or are tha stoppin' ere?" ...and the old one:

"Darn t'Wicker weer t'watter runs o'er t'weer"

As for words grouped together: "supwidee?" and "gerritetten" are my own favourites.

O tha from uther side o hills lad, "Darn t'Wicker weer t'watter runs o'er t'weer" is Lancashire talk. Get rid o t an thall hav gorrit reight, like this: "Darn Wicker weer watter runs o'er weer". :P

ukmike2000
09-03-2008, 15:09
[QUOTE=PopT;2994125]When we were kids we'd get a 'scutch at the back of the neck' if we were naughty.

I wonder if that phrase was only used in this area?



Scutching is still used in brickwork - it is a glancing blow using a "scutching hammer" - a hammer with a hardened steel comb, which grooves the face of brickwork prior to applying rendering and giving a better "key" to the surface. The word is originally French from Latin roots I believe and originally referred to separating linen fibres by hammering and combing out the woody parts. Later used by bricklayers. Its use in Sheffield perhaps derives from brickies in the steelworks, lining furnaces and crucibles with brickwork and then scutching the surface to apply an inner lining of fireclay or ganister.

Bushbaby
09-03-2008, 15:32
[QUOTE=PopT;2994125]When we were kids we'd get a 'scutch at the back of the neck' if we were naughty.
.

On The Cross we would get a "Thrapp" on the back of the neck, and by some strange form of rhyming slang it evolved into a "Thrapp on the Wilson" (Wilson-Peck = Neck)

hillsbro
09-03-2008, 17:05
O tha from uther side o hills lad, "Darn t'Wicker weer t'watter runs o'er t'weer" is Lancashire talk. Get rid o t an thall hav gorrit reight, like this: "Darn Wicker weer watter runs o'er weer". :P

Well, I dunno. I've only lived in Lincolnshire for a year, and it seems that I've already lost touch wi' me roots. I'll have to down a few pints in the Old Blue Ball and take a few lessons.....;)

Eater Sundae
09-03-2008, 23:14
Not dialect, but a saying I remember,

"he's neither use nor an ornament"

Puffin4
28-03-2008, 17:43
I recall when I was a callow youth in the early 50's, I must have seemed a bit of a dozy chuff to my father who was always telling me that I needed to "bloody frame". I never did sort out the meaning of the expression. He was a born and bred Sheffielder (Wincobank) so I doubt he picked it up elsewhere.

Plain Talker
28-03-2008, 17:56
<snippitty>As for words grouped together: "supwidee?" and "gerritetten" are my own favourites.

"Gerritetten" was a meal often served Chez Talker.

When we came in from school yelling "Mam, amungeri" (mam ! I'm hungry!") and asked her wha wa for tea, we'd be told "gerritetten, that's what! ", or "what tha's givven!"

Puffin4
28-03-2008, 18:45
I remember that question often being answered with "bread and scrape". ie. the jam was spread on the bread and then scraped off again in the interests of economy - int waar tha nose.

nanrobbo
29-03-2008, 02:39
I recall when I was a callow youth in the early 50's, I must have seemed a bit of a dozy chuff to my father who was always telling me that I needed to "bloody frame". I never did sort out the meaning of the expression. He was a born and bred Sheffielder (Wincobank) so I doubt he picked it up elsewhere.
Probably means the same as straighten thissen up, or smarten thissen up!

CarolW
29-03-2008, 08:26
I recall when I was a callow youth in the early 50's, I must have seemed a bit of a dozy chuff to my father who was always telling me that I needed to "bloody frame". I never did sort out the meaning of the expression. He was a born and bred Sheffielder (Wincobank) so I doubt he picked it up elsewhere.

I remember my grandad saying "Tha'd better frame up" - I think he meant "Sort yourself out" or "Behave yourself"!!!!