View Full Version : Woodbine cigarettes


Arfer Mo
13-04-2006, 18:37
Does any one recall the machines dispensing2 woodbines and 2 matches for a penny, there were not many,they was in a green packet Arthur

peterw
13-04-2006, 20:28
I remember them well, Arthur. But wasn’t it two Woodbines and three matches. There was one outside a shop in Ecclesall Road that I tried a few times when I first started smoking. I think I was about nine or ten. Soon gave it up though. I could buy a lot of sweets for a penny!

twinky1
14-04-2006, 08:52
I don't recall the machines but in the early 50's my dad smoked Woodbine and Mum smoked ParkDrive,little cigs with no tips, they must have killed the throat,did you ever smoke Craven'A'?
I have an old tin sign that say's " For your throat's sake Smoke Craven 'A' they never vary - from the picture it looks like they have tips on.

Arfer Mo
14-04-2006, 17:50
Hi Twinky, No,they were for sore throats they gave you one!

twinky1
14-04-2006, 18:45
Hi Twinky, No,they were for sore throats they gave you one!

And here's me thinking it does what it says on the tin!!!!!!!!!

Twinky.

all4_ofus
14-04-2006, 18:58
when I think back about the different brands I tried..the first I ever smoked were Meadow Gold,then I graduated to Woodbines,Parkdrive etc..at one time I smoked Capstan full strength,and Camel...that was then ,I'm paying for it now..cough cough

twinky1
14-04-2006, 19:08
[QUOTE=all4_ofus]when I think back about the different brands I tried..the first I ever smoked were Meadow Gold,then I graduated to Woodbines,Parkdrive etc..at one time I smoked Capstan full strength,and Camel...that was then ,I'm paying for it now..cough cough[/QUO

Never heard of Meadow Gold - sounds more like a low fat spread but obviously not as good for you.
twinky

shoeshine
14-04-2006, 19:32
Many years ago, Arthur, my dad smoked Woodbines...he couldn't smoke Park Drive.

I started smoking at 15, and tried a variety of brands, starting with Woodbines, Park Drive...which I couldn't stand.......then Players Medium Cut and finally Players Full Strength.........real early coffin material.

On occasion I tried Black Russian Sobranie, real man-about town, in those days.......finally ending for many years on Benson & Hedges............now I drag on Sovereign...........as someone else commented (cough..cough..cough) :)

At the last breath, we all have to die of something.........

jdog2
15-04-2006, 08:18
why not stop smoking its easy try it

chuffinel
15-04-2006, 12:41
why not stop smoking its easy try it
One of my co-workers said the same thing. It was so easy to stop that he had done it six or seven times.

Arfer Mo
15-04-2006, 17:02
Many years ago, Arthur, my dad smoked Woodbines...he couldn't smoke Park Drive.

I started smoking at 15, and tried a variety of brands, starting with Woodbines, Park Drive...which I couldn't stand.......then Players Medium Cut and finally Players Full Strength.........real early coffin material.

On occasion I tried Black Russian Sobranie, real man-about town, in those days.......finally ending for many years on Benson & Hedges............now I drag on Sovereign...........as someone else commented (cough..cough..cough) :)

At the last breath, we all have to die of something.........
Hi I started smoking when about 9yrs old they was Others Mixture took a bit of finding because people did not throw them away very big [yes they were dog ends as we called them]we would collect a bag full of big ones then retire to our den with our fag papers and make as many as we could, sell a few , be sick then buy sweets to make us better! Arthur. [ Gave up about 30 yrs ago]

Arfer Mo
15-04-2006, 17:22
Nor did I arthur

only_me
15-04-2006, 18:11
Capstan full strengh, they were strong' cough cough.

sweetdexter
16-04-2006, 01:35
Remember 'Players Weights' and 'Turf' both priced the same as Woodbine's and Park Drive

Albatross
16-04-2006, 04:28
There was a little story told in cigarette names that an old fella in the steel works told me.Can't remember it all but here goes with what I can remember.

Little Willy Woodbine took Lilly White down Park Drive.
When a Star was hid by a Passing Cloud her showed her his Robin

sorry folks but thats all I can remember maybe someone else knows the whole thing and can put it right.

bluebird62
16-04-2006, 06:14
Little willy WOODBINE
Took sally GOLDFAKE up PARK DRIVE
Laid her on the TURF
Took out his BAR 1 and popped it in her NAVY CUT.

[another version from the steel works in the 50's]

mikeG
24-04-2006, 15:34
I don't recall the machines but in the early 50's my dad smoked Woodbine and Mum smoked ParkDrive,little cigs with no tips, they must have killed the throat,did you ever smoke Craven'A'?
I have an old tin sign that say's " For your throat's sake Smoke Craven 'A' they never vary - from the picture it looks like they have tips on.

I'm pretty sure they were cork tips Twinky. Cork stuck round the outside of the fag with no filter tip in the middle. You still bot baccy in yer mouth so I don't know quite why they were invented. Maybe to stop the paper becoming soggy.

peterw
24-04-2006, 23:21
I’ve never heard of Meadow Gold, but thinking about the different brands during the second world war brings to mind State Express 333, State Express 555, Sobranie, Passing Cloud, Joysticks (twice the length of ordinary cigs), Woodbines (at one time only available in tens and not in twenties), Park Drive (at one time only available in twenties and not tens), Players Weights, Turf, Sweet Afton (an Irish brand), Sweet Caporal (Canadian version okay, French version absolute crap), Lucky Strike (toasted tobacco), Camel (toasted tobacco), Nosegay (really awful), Players Medium Navy Cut, Capstan Medium, Capstan Full Strength and all the Co-operative Society’s own brands which were produced from their factory in Manchester. And let’s not forget Senior Service, Black Cat (4 extra free), Craven A (which tasted awful if you lit the cork tip while lighting up in a darkened cinema), Stuyvesant and — to bring it to a close — the best of the lot if you were in the RN, and that was the monthly allowance of ‘Tickler’, a roll your own tobacco straight from Virginia and without any mix of the Empire’s tobaccos! At Pompey we could get Tickler machine-rolled with HM Barracks, Portsmouth printed on the cigarette papers.

Bushbaby
25-04-2006, 00:47
In my early smoking days (thankfully long behind me now) I used to like "Cadets" and "Kensitas" - we used to nick them from the paper shop. Mom always smoked Woodies, Dad went from Parkies to No 6 (tipped) in the 60s, in the hope that tipped cggies wouldn't kill him.
They did!

Jan39
25-04-2006, 08:01
Does any one recall the machines dispensing2 woodbines and 2 matches for a penny, there were not many,they was in a green packet Arthur
I don't remember the 2 for a penny woodbines, but I do remember the little packs of 5 woodbines you could buy in the fifties.

Greybeard
25-04-2006, 09:17
perterw, - you left at least one brand out of your list. An expensive brand called 'Three Castles'; they were in a green packet, in 20s only and I think they were made by Wills.

I remember my mother used to get a Christmas gift each year of a box of Sheffield made ciggies called Porter's. They came in a plain white box of 100 with 'Porter's Luxury Cigarettes' embossed on the top. Used to keep my best marbles in one of these boxes :)

Well remember the quarter pound tins of shag, and the tailor made version which we called 'Blue Liners'; - at sea many of the brands could only be bought in tins of fifty and there were what we called 'Ship's Woodbines', which were the same size as Players and Capstan medium etc.

peterw
25-04-2006, 12:19
Not only forgot Three Castles, also forgot Cadets and Kensitas. But it was a long time ago! Searching my memory, was there not a time when Three Castles was printed on the packet as Three Caftles?

Greybeard
25-04-2006, 18:18
Searching my memory, was there not a time when Three Castles was printed on the packet as Three Caftles?

It was an 'Olde English' typeface as shown here...

http://www.tinshop.co.uk//pics//1120a.jpg

Arfer Mo
25-04-2006, 22:03
I'm pretty sure they were cork tips Twinky. Cork stuck round the outside of the fag with no filter tip in the middle. You still bot baccy in yer mouth so I don't know quite why they were invented. Maybe to stop the paper becoming soggy. i believe they were to stop the paper sticking to ones lips

peterw
26-04-2006, 00:05
Thanks for that, Greybeard. What a nasty person you’ve turned out to be! I like the ‘typeface’ (new English for ‘fount’ but old English for ‘font’) so much that I’m currently looking for it. Wish me luck — our CD font library has just over 25,000 of ’em, and I’m betting I don’t have it! Looks to me like a design exclusively for Three Castles. Nice to see it though, absolutely beautiful — if fonts can be so described.

Greybeard
26-04-2006, 11:39
Looks to me like a design exclusively for Three Castles. Nice to see it though, absolutely beautiful — if fonts can be so described.

I think there's some artistic licence on the cover of the packet. The 's' in the printing on the side looks quite conventional.

peterw
26-04-2006, 16:58
Greybeard, there’s certainly some poetic licence in Three Castles. I scanned the illustration and left the computer to match it up — but nothing! What a pity. The one thing I’m no good as it is fontography — but I know someone who is!

smoker
28-04-2006, 09:12
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gingercat1
19-05-2006, 02:36
I don't recall the machines but in the early 50's my dad smoked Woodbine and Mum smoked ParkDrive,little cigs with no tips, they must have killed the throat,did you ever smoke Craven'A'?
I have an old tin sign that say's " For your throat's sake Smoke Craven 'A' they never vary - from the picture it looks like they have tips on.

dad smoked woodbine and for christmas one year my brother and i bought 5, a pack of polo mints and a shaving stick, we took everything out of their packets and filled a brown paper sack, this made it look like he had more!! only trouble was that the cigs tasted like minty soap.we also gave mom black majic chocolates, only because we knew she didn't like them and that way we would get to eat them all! was a lot of fun being a poor kid.

mickdalewood
19-05-2006, 17:10
when i was younger i was told that woodbines were 10% bacca & 90%marmalade leaves they were that bad:gag:

kenfozzy
25-02-2007, 12:45
I used to prefer Woodbines to Mum and Dads Parkdrive. They would not smoke Woodbine but I did not refuse the Parkdrive when offered. Does anyone remember 'Dominoes'? Four for sixpence and if you were lucky the shop keeper used to put a few matches in with them. These cigs were in an open ended paper pack with the markings of a dominoe on the back. All different.

saxon51
25-02-2007, 13:09
Once walked into a Chinese restaurant and asked for 20 No6.

Ended walking out with 20 portions of King prawn and mushroom chow mein. :|

flyer
25-02-2007, 13:36
During my army days 1952 nth Africa every now & then we got a supply of cig's fm British customs,the s major would dig his hand in the sack & you got what ever 5 packs his hand could grab, but even we would not smoke those "Pasha"they came during the war and was made fm pure camel dung,we just handed to the locals.

Elmambo
25-02-2007, 14:07
We used to collect all thre different fag packets in the 50's, there was a large variety, much more colourful than today. Still got about a hundred of them in a tin somewhere. Do you remember the thin paper packets used just after the war ?

poppins
25-02-2007, 14:47
I use to buy 5 woodbines on my way to work every day, the matches were as big as the cigs themselves, my Dad use to roll his own, he used a little gadget that snapped together and the cig came out....funnny I don't recall smelling smoke in the house though, I wonder if the fire place going all the time had anything to do with it .

Greybeard
25-02-2007, 15:01
....funnny I don't recall smelling smoke in the house though, I wonder if the fire place going all the time had anything to do with it .

I believe I read somewhere that people with a traditional open fireplace suffer far fewer chest complaints, asthma etc., than those with closed solid fuel burners or gas fires. Something to do with the rate of air change in the room I think.

wwcrazy
25-02-2007, 15:03
oooo woodbines, takes me back to my childhood, they were my dads smokes. I can smell them now.

buck
25-02-2007, 18:35
I don't recall the machines but in the early 50's my dad smoked Woodbine and Mum smoked ParkDrive,little cigs with no tips, they must have killed the throat,did you ever smoke Craven'A'?
I have an old tin sign that say's " For your throat's sake Smoke Craven 'A' they never vary - from the picture it looks like they have tips on.Craven A were "posh" cigarettes with cork tips to stop the paper sticking to your lip, but they were not filtered. They were considered effeminate at the time. Real men smoked Capstan full strength or Senior Service with no tip. Woodbines were tiny and smoked out in less than five minutes. Old guys used to finish them off with a pin when they got too small to hold with their fingers. Park Drives were the same size but tasted desperate. Everybody smoked. You couldn't see the screen at the pictures sometimes for the smoke. Everybody smoked and died young. We used to blame the works chimney stacks for it.

buck
25-02-2007, 18:44
Remember 'Players Weights' and 'Turf' both priced the same as Woodbine's and Park DriveThey were awful. Toward the end of the war when you couldn't find a woodbine to save your life Weights and Turf were about all you could along with a disaster called Pasha made with turkish tobacco. I should have stopped then, but soldiered on till I joined the navy and got all the cigs I could buy duty free. I'vr been quit for years, but the craving comes back now and then. I don't give in to it though. Emphysema reminds me of what I did wrong.

BLITZER
25-02-2007, 21:16
I’ve never heard of Meadow Gold, but thinking about the different brands during the second world war brings to mind State Express 333, State Express 555, Sobranie, Passing Cloud, Joysticks (twice the length of ordinary cigs), Woodbines (at one time only available in tens and not in twenties), Park Drive (at one time only available in twenties and not tens), Players Weights, Turf, Sweet Afton (an Irish brand), Sweet Caporal (Canadian version okay, French version absolute crap), Lucky Strike (toasted tobacco), Camel (toasted tobacco), Nosegay (really awful), Players Medium Navy Cut, Capstan Medium, Capstan Full Strength and all the Co-operative Society’s own brands which were produced from their factory in Manchester. And let’s not forget Senior Service, Black Cat (4 extra free), Craven A (which tasted awful if you lit the cork tip while lighting up in a darkened cinema), Stuyvesant and — to bring it to a close — the best of the lot if you were in the RN, and that was the monthly allowance of ‘Tickler’, a roll your own tobacco straight from Virginia and without any mix of the Empire’s tobaccos! At Pompey we could get Tickler machine-rolled with HM Barracks, Portsmouth printed on the cigarette papers.

You've just about mentioned all the brands of years ago Peterw,but was'nt it Kensitas that gave "4 for your friends"? I remember in the Navy during WW2
receiving free packets of "Cape to Cairo" and "Martin's" . I'd rather have smoked dried horse manure! I too remember "Tickler tobacco,it was 9p for a sealed half pound tin,and there was also a similar tin for pipe smokers. Duty free cigarettes were a better buy,for me anyway,with 20 players,or Senior Service or Capstan for 6d(two and a half pence). There were also duty free
Woobines(bigger than the normal civvy ones) and they were 20 for 4d(one and a half pence). You may think that was cheap, and by todays prices,they
certainly are,but our pay was crap too. I stopped smoking 45 years ago,one of the best decisions I ever made.

TonyRevitt
25-02-2007, 22:07
Not only forgot Three Castles, also forgot Cadets and Kensitas. But it was a long time ago! Searching my memory, was there not a time when Three Castles was printed on the packet as Three Caftles?

And Churchmans, with two for your friends

Heeley tyke
27-02-2007, 16:58
It was in the late 40s, early 50s when I started smoking.
Cigs were in short supply and you smoked what you could get.
Players Airman were popular but Senior Service were very hard to get.
Turf, Nosegay and Bar One were absolutely awful. There was a novelty cig called Joystick that was twice as long as an ordinary cig. Another was Royalty that was twice as thick.
For a short time I smoked a pipe and my favourite tobacco was Baby's Bottom.
It came in a tin with a pic of a kiddie's bottom on it and the slogan, "As smooth as a Baby's Bottom!"

I stopped smoking in 1985 after a heavy cold and lost the taste for them altogether. I was fortunate as I would never have stopped otherwise.

mikeG
27-02-2007, 20:23
In the early 60's I'd often bus it into Sheffield on a Saturday morning with 1 or 2 mates. Few coffees, look in the record shops etc. There was a tobacconists not far from Barkers Pool that sold Blue Book I think they were called. In a pack of 10, you got 2 virginia, 2 turkish, 2 french, 2 sobranie and 2 something else. Made a change. I think Balkan Sobranie were the nicest I've tasted. Gave up 9 years ago.

flyer
01-03-2007, 13:16
Nobody seems to remember "Pasha" came out during the war

Heeley tyke
01-03-2007, 15:41
Nobody seems to remember "Pasha" came out during the war


Gawwddd... Pasha and Grand Turk.... Yuk!!!

I remember there was a film being shown in the forties called "The Mask of Dimitrios"
In the plot, the actor, Sydney Greenstreet, walks into a Turkish bar and asks for twenty Pasha.
The derision of the audience echoed round the cinema!

mickr
02-03-2007, 16:25
Did anyone mention Du Maurier (spelling??) My headmistress at Huntsmans Gardens school - Miss Hoyle - used to have a box on her desk and chain-smoke them. Late 50's.

Heeley tyke
02-03-2007, 16:34
My grandfather smoked Greys from as far back as I can remember.
I also remember him smoking Passing Clouds. They came in a pinkish packet and they were oval shaped.

Nigel Womersle
06-03-2007, 01:39
Was it Kensitas that had two extra fags in them and stated 'two extra for your friends?' I remember Domino cigarettes too, also Lucky Black Cat.

Heeley tyke
06-03-2007, 01:52
Was it Kensitas that had two extra fags in them and stated 'two extra for your friends?' I remember Domino cigarettes too, also Lucky Black Cat.

Kensitas had a pull-off section announcing... "And four for your friends"

Nigel Womersle
07-03-2007, 00:26
Kensitas had a pull-off section announcing... "And four for your friends"

Thanks for that Heeley tyke. I knew someone would be able to tell me.

jiginc
08-03-2007, 20:58
"think Balkan Sobranie were the nicest I've tasted."

I thought it was pipe tobaco.

nedwilson
01-07-2008, 12:43
What happened to Woodbines? Did they disappear in a puff of smoke one day or did they fade away......

Janner
02-07-2008, 12:33
You've just about mentioned all the brands of years ago Peterw,but was'nt it Kensitas that gave "4 for your friends"? I remember in the Navy during WW2
receiving free packets of "Cape to Cairo" and "Martin's" . I'd rather have smoked dried horse manure! I too remember "Tickler tobacco,it was 9p for a sealed half pound tin,and there was also a similar tin for pipe smokers. Duty free cigarettes were a better buy,for me anyway,with 20 players,or Senior Service or Capstan for 6d(two and a half pence). There were also duty free
Woobines(bigger than the normal civvy ones) and they were 20 for 4d(one and a half pence). You may think that was cheap, and by todays prices,they
certainly are,but our pay was crap too. I stopped smoking 45 years ago,one of the best decisions I ever made.

In the RN out in the far east our duty free cigarettes came mostly in tins, round and also flat. Along with the Players & Senior Service we had State Express. I first went to Germany in 1950 (Hamburg) you would be surprised at the exchanges we could get for a tin of "ticklers"

Janner
02-07-2008, 12:36
Woodbines were available in packets of five, the packet was made of paper and the top was open.

nedwilson
02-07-2008, 22:34
Does anyone remember Cavalla a South African brand I recall from the 1950s?

fleetwood
03-07-2008, 21:52
One can't talk about cigarettes without mentioning 'cigarette cards', I suppose when smoking was all the rage, it was'nt everybody that saved them. I know when I was a kid, some would have albums full of these cards in every conceivable type, cars,footballers, horse racing etc etc. It goes without saying to-day, complete sets would be worth a lot of money. But does anyone remember the 'silk' give aways that came with one certain brand of cigarette. Might these have been 'Kensitas'? I can remember a 'flags of the different nations collection' on these 'silks'. They were bigger than a cigarette card and wrapped in tissue paper.

flyer
04-07-2008, 12:04
In the M.N as a young lad never smoked at that time but on the boat going out to oz aways picked up a few cans of roll-yu-own (Duty free),always good for sale or trade, down under real men did not smoke tailor made that was left for the ladys and other case's, although at that time the record for one hand rolling was held by a lady,I think the long finger nail must have helped:|:|

kingfisher
04-07-2008, 12:12
My Dad used to smoke cork tipped Star,there were very few tobacconist sold them but Fowlers in the Wicker always had them.you could get a 5 pack of woodbines plus a few matches for 2 old pence 10 packs were 4pence but some cut price shops sold them for 3 1/2 pence.Iwell remember getting on the tram going to work at 5-30am going upstairs and the old geezers had a pipe going like Osbornes chimney,you could hardly breathe

buck
04-07-2008, 14:00
I'm pretty sure they were cork tips Twinky. Cork stuck round the outside of the fag with no filter tip in the middle. You still bot baccy in yer mouth so I don't know quite why they were invented. Maybe to stop the paper becoming soggy.I think it was because the cigarette paper sometimes stuck to your lip and tear the skin away when you trid to take tha cig out of your mouth. Cork tips were considered a bit feminine for a time, and you could get called a poofter.

buck
04-07-2008, 14:09
I’ve never heard of Meadow Gold, but thinking about the different brands during the second world war brings to mind State Express 333, State Express 555, Sobranie, Passing Cloud, Joysticks (twice the length of ordinary cigs), Woodbines (at one time only available in tens and not in twenties), Park Drive (at one time only available in twenties and not tens), Players Weights, Turf, Sweet Afton (an Irish brand), Sweet Caporal (Canadian version okay, French version absolute crap), Lucky Strike (toasted tobacco), Camel (toasted tobacco), Nosegay (really awful), Players Medium Navy Cut, Capstan Medium, Capstan Full Strength and all the Co-operative Society’s own brands which were produced from their factory in Manchester. And let’s not forget Senior Service, Black Cat (4 extra free), Craven A (which tasted awful if you lit the cork tip while lighting up in a darkened cinema), Stuyvesant and — to bring it to a close — the best of the lot if you were in the RN, and that was the monthly allowance of ‘Tickler’, a roll your own tobacco straight from Virginia and without any mix of the Empire’s tobaccos! At Pompey we could get Tickler machine-rolled with HM Barracks, Portsmouth printed on the cigarette papers.The RN began issuing cigarettes ready made in blue and white packs of 25 . You were allowed 200 a month, and could go ashore with 25 a day. Aboard ship,name brands were duty free, and the RN packs were not available. Army and RAF types tried to get the RN privelages taken away, because they didn't get any. Typically, they didn't try to GET the privelages for themselves. No wonder we were the Senior Service just like the cigs of the same name.

brian1941
12-10-2008, 13:51
In my early smoking days (thankfully long behind me now) I used to like "Cadets" and "Kensitas" - we used to nick them from the paper shop. Mom always smoked Woodies, Dad went from Parkies to No 6 (tipped) in the 60s, in the hope that tipped cggies wouldn't kill him.
They did!
-------------
hi bushbaby, i tried the odd fag at 9yrs young and that was it,
then starting senior school where lads dared you to have a fag,
it did get to me and stated up 1956/7.
i was smoking parkdrives i hated the woodbines, i use to chop fire wood
and put them in little bungles and sell them at 3d.
that got me my money for my ciggies, i when onto smoking no6 /no10s
then park drive tips, then roll ups golden virgina--old horburn.
hey,,not for getting them joysticks.
we bought them at a shop on earl marshall rd sheffield 4.
anyway, then was smoking whatever cheapest,---then i had this
bad cough and chest infections over a few years, so i went on patches
from doctors and that was it ---will be 4yrs next may when i stopped,
and i feel great after 50 odd years , yuppy--feeling fantastic.
when someone lights a fag up, i cant stand the smell,
but pipe tobaco i just love that smell--<< cor>> bloody smashing.

Joto
12-10-2008, 15:59
Hi bluebird and Mike those would be good on my silly rhymes thread :hihi:

Janner
12-10-2008, 16:37
in the early 40's we kids used to get cigs from a machine outside the paper shop. I can't remember the brand name but I remember the packet was printed with a dart board and three darts in the bull.

hillsbro
12-10-2008, 17:35
Does anyone remember 'Dominoes'? Four for sixpence and if you were lucky the shop keeper used to put a few matches in with them. These cigs were in an open ended paper pack with the markings of a dominoe on the back. All different.

My goodness, I had almost forgotten Domino fags. As you say they came in an open-ended paper pack, brown & yellow I think, and you could cut out the dominos from the back, paste them on to cardboard and make up a full set. They sold them at Ashforth's tobacconists in Hillsborough; that must have been about 1958.

We used to buy dried raspberry leaves from Styran's herbalists (10½d for 2 ounces) and roll cigarettes from them. I started selling them at school until I got caught and put in detention..:(

dublugee
14-10-2008, 11:48
My first penny packet of fags at the age of around ten was a waste of money because both matches were blown out by the breeze before I realised I didn't know how to light up. But what joy we had collecting cigarette cards!

Sweatshopboy
14-10-2008, 14:12
There used to be a small tobacconist down Bradfield Road that was a treasure trove for the smoker, it was a typical shop of it's time, the fifties/sixties small but all available space was used to display their wares, and what a selection, it would put today's supermarkets to shame. I used to experiment with different brands in the early sixties and bought many a exotic cig from this establishment, most have been named but here's some that seem to have been overlooked. I am really suprised nobody has mentioned the infamous your never alone with a "Strand" "Guards" very popular down south never caught on up here "De Rezke" "Sobrannie Cocktail" with the different coloured papers "Churchman's No 5" and "More" also the American brands "Herbert Tareton" "Fifth Avenue" and "Chesterfield's"

sierraman
14-10-2008, 14:18
I used to smoke Park Drive Tipped. They quite thoughtfully sold them in 5's in the newsagent at Lowedges Terminus, just so that school kids could also afford them!

poppins
14-10-2008, 14:29
I used to smoke Park Drive Tipped. They quite thoughtfully sold them in 5's in the newsagent at Lowedges Terminus, just so that school kids could also afford them!


Yes i use to buy a packet of 5 from a hole in the wall shop I think it was accross from Walker & Halls factory or Mapin & Webbs, I worked at both.

flyer
15-10-2008, 14:26
I was a Senior Service man but then I always was a class act

swervin
15-10-2008, 18:55
i remember years ago in 60s my mum used to sell fags from a wooden box with a drawer that was locked you had put money in to retrieve them neighbours all used to come round and buy fags from her parkdrive were the brand

soft ayperth
15-10-2008, 20:42
Never could stand Woodies. Park Drive was what I started out on, Senior Service when I could afford it. Then, I moved on to filters. Embassy cigs because they had those little blue coupons which you could save to buy items like pens and bicycles from a catalog, as long as your lungs held up.

As a kid, we even used to go around the streets picking up dog ends and rolling the baccy in them to form cigs using a small cig making machine .

Wonder I'm still alive. :gag:

Thank goodness I kicked the habit 30 years ago.

mikeG
16-10-2008, 10:18
Never could stand Woodies. Park Drive was what I started out on, Senior Service when I could afford it. Then, I moved on to filters. Embassy cigs because they had those little blue coupons which you could save to buy items like pens and bicycles from a catalog, as long as your lungs held up.

As a kid, we even used to go around the streets picking up dog ends and rolling the baccy in them to form cigs using a small cig making machine .

Wonder I'm still alive. :gag:

Thank goodness I kicked the habit 30 years ago.

We used to do that. Collecting fag ends off the streets, getting all the baccy out of them and then rolling our own. Not exactly Golden Virginia.